CT - West Hartford: West Hartford Clean Energy Commission

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West Hartford Clean Energy Commission

Clean Energy Commission Virtual Special Meeting

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, environment, clean energy, and energy

June 22, 2020 at 4:00 pm

This Special Meeting of the Clean Energy Commission will be conducted as a virtual meeting. Members of the public may view the meeting on West

Hartford Community Interactive: Comcast Channel 5 and Frontier TV Channel 6098, YouTube as well as www.whctv.org
Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, Telecommunications, environment, telecommunications, clean energy, Comcast, and energy

A copy of the written materials to be presented at the meeting are available on the Town Clerk s website at www.westhartfordct.gov.

Tagged Interests: materials

1. Roll Call

Commissioner Present Alternates Present Additional Attendees

Catherine Diviney Robert Palmer

Chris Nelson Dave Mello

Joe Campanella James Capella

Bernie Pelletier

Max DuBuisson

2. Approval of Minutes

3. Energy Plan Draft

Tagged Interests: energy

4. Discuss Plan for Public Comments or Feedback on Energy Plan

Tagged Interests: energy

5. Letter of Support for High Performance Building Standards (State Legislation)

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder and performance

6. Adjournment

ANY INDIVIDUAL WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN A MEETING OR PUBLIC HEARING SHOULD CONTACT SUZANNE OSLANDER,

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES, 860-561-7580 SEVEN DAYS PRIOR TO THE MEETING OR PUBLIC
Tagged Interests: special needs individual, social services, disability, services, and hearing

HEARING.

Tagged Interests: hearing

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Energy Plan West Hartford Clean Energy Commission 2020

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, environment, clean energy, and energy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

We aspire for our entire community to use 100 clean, renewable energy

Tagged Interests: energy

by 2050.

DRAFT June 16 2020

DRAFT June 16, 2020

a Note on COVID-19 and Racism? This Energy Plan was largely written before the COVID-19 outbreak and George Floyd s murder. However, we believe that,

rather than change anything, these pandemics have only served to reinforce this plan.
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, discrimination, civil rights, and energy

One particular area that standouts is equity and the need to address and care for our at- risk populations. Another area ispublic heatlth, recent

Sattilite data has shown the massive impact that stay safe stay hmme and the reduction of combustion of fossil fuel / transportation has had on pollution emissions.,. Finally, . Another is the opportunity afforded us as we recover and rebuild out of the disruption caused by the virus to transform our future by choosing a different energy path a cleaner, greener, more resilient, sustainable path. Get back to better. REAL improvements are poosible
Tagged Interests: transportation, risk, and energy

Now is the time. It is up to us.not noticsm Anti-racisim Acknowledge, commitment, transform. Racial equity plan. Commit to call out and anti- racison

in polices and practices and actions Seek out multiple perspectives, to first acknowledge racision and commitment to transform our policies, practices, and actions Move forward Anti-racisim learn and improve and grow.
Tagged Interests: public safety, discrimination, and racial

We acknowled and commit to anti-racision dismantle and transform or institution polices practices, actions.

Tagged Interests: public safety

Racial equity core tema. Establish andnti racim policy to serve equity and enviornmentla/climate justice PROCESS

Tagged Interests: discrimination, racial, environment, and policy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Introduction Energy is essential. It is the lifeblood of West Hartford. It heats and cools our buildings, runs our lights and appliances, and allows

us to travel to work and play. Yet, most of our energy still comes from the burning of fossil fuels, which is the biggest contributor to green house gas emissions and climate change.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, travel, environment, and energy

Our use of energy comes with an intrinsic responsibility to consume and produce it sustainably. Recognizing and acting on this responsibility today

is necessary to ensure that West Hartford continues to thrive and prosper. It protects our future and our children s future. It also offers opportunities to shape what that future looks like.
Tagged Interests: recognition and energy

As a local community, we have the power to affect change. The West Hartford Clean Energy Commission has prepared this 2020 Energy Plan to build on

the work of its 2009 Energy Plan and to guide the town toward greater energy efficiency and sustainability.
Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, environment, government efficiency, clean energy, sustainability, and energy

Implementing this plan will yield many benefits to our residents and businesses:

Tagged Interests: business

Economic and financial: By saving energy, we will save money: money that can be spent other basic needs, or maybe right here in town to support our

local ecomony. It may also create new jobs.
Tagged Interests: finance, energy, jobs, and job creation

Environmental, health, comfort: By saving energy and reducing fossil fuel use, we will lower emissions, improve air quality, and improve health,

especially for vunerable popultations like children and seniors. By making our homes and businesses more energy efficient, they will also be more comfortable.
Tagged Interests: health, business, seniors, environment, and energy

Equity. By focusing on inclusive solutions to save energy and provide assistance, we will make a difference in the lives of all our residents,

including those who are at risk and currently bear the largest energy burdens.
Tagged Interests: risk and energy

Security and resiliency: By reducing overall energy needs, modernizing our grid and increasing local generation, we will make our energy supply more

secure and be in a better position to weather storms, outages and other natural or man-made disasters..
Tagged Interests: security and energy

The State of Connecticut is committed to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 45 from 2001 levels by 2030. Governor Lamont s Executive Order No. 3

commits Connecticut to 100 carbon neutral electricity by 2040. This Energy Plan aims to achieve similar goals for West Hartford: We aspire for our entire community to use 100 clean, renewable energy by 2050.
Tagged Interests: energy

While it will be difficult to achieve this vision, it is both achievable even with today s technology and realistic as other cities and states have

set similar goals and timelines. There is general consensus that business as usual is not an option. Recently, more voices for youth and climate justice have joined in demanding action.
Tagged Interests: business, strategic, environment, Technology, technology, and youth

By fostering a culture of conservation throughout our community and by making the right choices, West Hartford can address energy and climate change

challenges in a meaningful way. Over the last decade, the town has lead by example. With the adoption of this plan, we will move our community forward into a efficient, clean, inclusive, and sustainable future.
Tagged Interests: Conservation, environment, and energy

West Hartford Clean Energy Commission, June 2020

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, environment, clean energy, and energy

Mayor Cantor and Council Members Sweeney and Kerrigan activate Town Hall s solar array, October 2019.

Tagged Interests: council

DRAFT June 16, 2020

West Hartford s Energy by Numbers With about 64,000 residents, West Hartford is the 9th largest town in Connecticut; we also rank 9th in energy use.

Tagged Interests: energy

The West Hartford Clean Energy Commission compiled data from local utilities and the town s grand list to estimate total community energy use. This

use includes: Residential (homes and apartments), Commercial (businesses, including industry and municipal operations), and Transportation (vehicles registered in West Hartford, including municipal and school buses). Details on these estimates can found in Appendix 1.
Tagged Interests: business, boards and commissions, utility, Utility, Public Transit, transportation, environment, commercial, education, clean energy, and energy

We estimate that in 2019, West Hartford: I still think MMBTU

Spent 168.5 million on energy, or 2,663 per person. Consumed the energy equivalent of 2,181 Gigawatt-hours, or 34,000 Kilowatt

Tagged Interests: energy

hours per person. Generated 556,727 tons of greenhouse gases (GHG), or 9 tons per person.

As shown in the pie-chart, two-thirds of West Hartford s energy use is Residential and Commercial, primarily building use, while one-third is

Transportation. Municipal operations account for less than 5 of the total.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, transportation, commercial, and energy

Direct fossil fuel use (red on the pie chart), which is the largest contributor to green house gas emissions and climate change, accounts for over 80

of West Hartford s total energy use. Residential and Commercial buildings rely on natural gas and fuel oil for heating. While our Transportation is almost exclusively comprised of vehicles that run on gasoline or diesel. Electricity represents 17 of total energy use.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, Fossil Fuels - Oil, transportation, environment, natural gas, commercial, and energy

Electricity 8

Natural Gas 25

Tagged Interests: natural gas

Fuel Oil 9

Tagged Interests: Fossil Fuels - Oil

Electricity 9

Natural Gas 14

Tagged Interests: natural gas

Fuel Oil 0

Tagged Interests: Fossil Fuels - Oil

Gasoline 31

Diesel 4

2019 Total Energy Use = 2,181 GWh

Tagged Interests: energy

Residential 42

Transportation 35

Tagged Interests: transportation

Commercial 23 Municipal use < 5

Tagged Interests: commercial

Direct fossil fuel use > 80

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0

100

200

300

400

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

M ill

io n

cc f

Natural Gas Use

Tagged Interests: natural gas

Commercial

Tagged Interests: commercial

Residential

West Hartford s Energy Trends West Hartford has not experienced any major growth or decline recently as a town that would significantly impact energy

use. West Hartford s total energy use is up/down XX from 2017, the first time the Clean Energy Commission compiled these numbers
Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, environment, clean energy, energy, and growth

0

200

400

600

2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

M ill

io n

kW h

Electricity Use

Commercial

Tagged Interests: commercial

Residential

-26

+13

0

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6,000

9,000

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K W

Solar Installations (cumulative)

of Installations Installed Capacity (KW)

Year Total Energy Use

Tagged Interests: energy

(GWh Change

2013

2017 2,181 GWh

2019 2,080 GWh -4

As reported by local utilities, West Hartford s electricity use has declined 26 since 2103 to 369 Million kWh in 2019. Energy efficiency and solar

energy, generated and consumed on site, or behind the meter, are likely reasons for this drop. The Commercial sector has seen a bigger drop than Residential.
Tagged Interests: utility, Utility, commercial, solar power, government efficiency, and energy

Another notable trend is the rise of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in the last decade. There are about 700 solar installations in town with

total capacity of about 6.7 MW (or 8 Million kWh annually). About 650 West Hartford homes have gone solar. Twelve municipal buildings, including 7 schools, also have solar. Since 2014, West Hartford has been adding just over 100 installations ( or 1 MW of capacity) a year. Make just residential
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, education, and photovoltaic

On the other hand, gas use, has increased 13 since 2013 to 31.7 Million ccf in 2019. Conversions to natural gas are likely one of the drivers behind

this increase. Town assessor data indicates an increase of XXX homes heated by natural gas from 2017 (XXXX) to 2019 (xxx). Weather can also impact the annual use of natural gas for heating.
Tagged Interests: natural gas

. Ask Bernie about solar s (Resident vs total). At this rate, it would take about 200 years to build out our capacity locally.

DRAFT June 16, 2020

100 Clean Energy by 2050 West Hartford aspires to use 100 clean energy by 2050. The path to 100 clean energy comprises two complementary actions as

illustrated in the chart below:
Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

1. We must reduce our overall energy consumption dramatically. 2. We must increase the energy that comes from clean, renewable sources.

Tagged Interests: energy

The goal is to reach a point 100 Clean Energy where our new efficient level of consumption is supplied entirely by clean, renewable sources.

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

Minimizing energy use must be a priority. We estimate that in order to reach 100 clean energy, West Hartford will need to reduce energy consumption

by about 50- 60 in roughly 30 years. This may seem like an impossible task, but, mathematically it represents only a 2.5-3 drop in total energy use per year. Over a five year period, it is a drop of 14 .
Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

Some reductions will be achieved through behavior change or adoption of simple energy efficiency measures like home weatherization or installing LED

lights. But, significant reductions will depend on the adoption of new, more transformative technologies to move us away from direct fossil fuel use for building heating and cooling and transportation. For example, electric vehicles have significantly better fuel economy than conventional vehicles and zero tailpipe emissions. Electric heat pumps can deliver efficiency levels of 300 (3 units of heat or every 1 unit of energy) compared to 98 for a condensing natural gas or oil furnace. As we move away from direct fossil fuel use and strategically electrify certain end-uses, we expect the amount of electricity we use to increase. It will require policy and planning to ensure reliable infrastructure and capacity is available to support these changes (e.g., EV chargers, a modernized electric grid).
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, planning, Fossil Fuels - Oil, transportation, electric, natural gas, policy, government efficiency, Electric Vehicles, energy, economy, and behavior

Likewise, our transition to clean energy will not happen overnight. It will involve a range of simpler, short-term solutions, such as the replacement

of fossil fuels with greener alternatives, like bio-fuels or fuel-cells, and long-term solutions like the development of storage and a modern smart electric grid, powered by distributed local and regional renewable generation like solar, off-shore wind, or other emerging technologies.
Tagged Interests: development, electric, environment, Development, clean energy, and energy

The path to 100 clean energy by 2050 will be an evolving journey, but one we must make. Some key elements of this Energy Plan are:

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

1. Reduce energy use by improving the efficiency of our buildings public and private. 2. Transition heating and cooling in buildings to more

efficient technologies that will
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, government efficiency, and energy

enable the use of clean energy 3. Promote alternative mobility (e.g., bike, walk, public transport) and the transition to

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, energy, and bicycle

electric vehicles, including planning for sufficient charging infrastructure. 4. Promote the responsible development of renewable energy in town,

including
Tagged Interests: planning, development, electric, Development, Electric Vehicles, and energy

residential rooftop solar, community shared solar, commercial solar and solar carports Geo thermal, solar thermal?

Tagged Interests: commercial

5. Explore and advocate for other clean, renewable energy options both locally and regionally, such as solar, bio-fuels, wind, and a cleaner grid,

including collaboration with utilities to modernize our electric grid to enable higher levels of renewables.
Tagged Interests: utility, Utility, electric, and energy

6. Ensure that our solutions are inclusive and equitable, serving and protecting the interests of all our residents.2030 2050 2080

En er

gy U

se

Time

100 Clean Energy

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

Renewable

Non-Renewable

DRAFT June 16, 2020

2030 2050 2080 En

er gy

U se

Time

100 Clean Energy

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

Approach Energy efficiency is sometimes referred to as the first fuel because it offers the possibility of reducing energy consumption before turning

to the more complex, often more expensive question of energy generation.
Tagged Interests: government efficiency and energy

To drive down energy use in the Residential, Commercial, and Transportation sectors, our approach centers on three strategies that are within our

power to accomplish:
Tagged Interests: transportation, commercial, and energy

1. Provide education and outreach to engage and encourage the community to make responsible energy choices

Tagged Interests: education and energy

2. Facilitate and support participation in energy programs and services and the adoption of new technology and capital improvements

Tagged Interests: capital spending, Capital Spending, services, program, Technology, technology, and energy

3. Develop and support policy and planning to ensure an sustainable clean energy future and the infrastructure to support it.

Tagged Interests: planning, environment, policy, clean energy, and energy

These same three strategies will help facilitate the transition to Clean Energy.

Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

We have also selected a handful of indicators for each sector While not comprehensive by any means, these metrics are readily available and we

believe will provide insight into our progress towards 100 clean energy by 2050.
Tagged Interests: environment, clean energy, and energy

3 Strategies 1. Education Outreach 2. Participation Adoption 3. Policy Planning

Tagged Interests: planning, education, and policy

4 Sectors 1. Residential 2. Commercial 3. Transportation 4. Clean Energy

Tagged Interests: transportation, environment, commercial, clean energy, and energy

Non-Renewable

Renewable

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Residential About 1/3 of our community s energy use is Residential. Some members of our community have trouble paying their monthly utility bills. In

2019, the town s Social Services department processed XXX applications for Energy Assistance.
Tagged Interests: social services, utility, Utility, services, and energy

Many West Hartford homes were built in the 1950-60s and have ample opportunities to improve efficiency. Efficiency can have an immediate impact by

reducing energy bills and delivering savings year after year to increase household disposable income or pay off an investment. Many improvements have additional benefits of making a home more comfortable or increasing property value.
Tagged Interests: property, investment, government efficiency, and energy

A wide range of programs and incentives exist for residents both home- owners and renters to make their homes more efficient or purchase energy-

efficient equipment and appliances. Additional assistance is available for residents who meet certain income eligibility criteria.
Tagged Interests: equipment, program, purchasing, energy, and incentive

Typically 50 of a household s annual energy use is for heating and cooling. In West Hartford, most homes heat with fossil fuel natural gas (66 ) or

fuel oil (31 ). A typical residential furnace is about 80-85 efficient; new high- performance one can reach 95-98 efficient. However, an electric air-source heat pump can deliver efficiencies of over 300 by recovering hot/cold air allowing homeowners to lower their energy costs, and at the same time, reduce direct fossil fuel use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Long used for cooling in warm climates, heat pumps are now able to provide efficient heating in cold climates, even at outdoor temperatures as low as -15 F. Heat pumps are capable of both heating and cooling, using the same technology as a refrigerators or air conditioners. Heat pumps can be used alongside existing heating systems to address specific needs and lower cost. They can also be a convenient way to add air conditioning to older homes.
Tagged Interests: Fossil Fuels - Oil, performance, electric, environment, natural gas, Technology, technology, and energy

By educating and incentivizing residents to reduce energy needs through common sense efficiency measures, towns can help mitigate the need to

increase generation of electricity and expansion of natural gas lines.
Tagged Interests: expansion, natural gas, government efficiency, and energy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Residential Progress Goals Benefits Lower energy bills More comfortable, healthy living environments Reduced need for energy generation Greater

security Greater resiliency during extreme weather Lower CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions Local job creation
Tagged Interests: security, Conservation, environment, energy, and job creation

2022 Goals 30 of residents participate in EnergizeCT

energy efficiency programs 10 of residents receive rebates for performing

Tagged Interests: program, government efficiency, and energy

energy retrofits. Drop in of energy assistance applications At least 6 drop in residential energy use,

Tagged Interests: energy

including a shift from oil and natural gas to electricity

Tagged Interests: Fossil Fuels - Oil and natural gas

X homes using heat pumps

Long-Term Goals 100 of residents participate in programs 50 of residents receive rebates 0 applications for energy assistance 50 drop in residential

energy use
Tagged Interests: program and energy

Progress-to-Date 20 of households participate in EnergizeCT

efficiency programs LED lightbulb swaps held at libraries and

Tagged Interests: program, government efficiency, and library

Elmwood CC Occasional community presentations and WH-

CPTV programming Energy Assistance case officer located on-site at

Tagged Interests: energy

town hall

Approach 1. Education Outreach. Increase energy efficiency awareness via multi-touch, multi-channel messaging. Use website, social media, email, tax

inserts, video, events, networking, etc. Consider using multiple languages. Work with partners like Social Services, Housing Authority of WH, WHPS, houses of worship, EnergizeCT, Efficiency for All, utilities, contractors, etc.
Tagged Interests: contractor, construction, social services, taxes, Taxes, utility, Utility, services, events, education, social media law, government efficiency, networking, energy, and housing

2. Participation Adoption. Promote Home Energy Solutions and other energy programs. Host giveaways or sign-up events. Educate about

options/technology like LEDs, EnergyStar appliances or electric heat pumps. Showcase positive examples and stories. Target specific groups such as low-to- income residents, oil-heated homes, new home owners, etc. Identify identify and address barriers (e.g., landlord permission, language, financing)
Tagged Interests: grocery, Fossil Fuels - Oil, events, program, electric, Technology, technology, rental, and energy

3. Policy Planning. Investigate use of municipal building, tax codes to accelerate efficiency. Work towards zero-energy new construction policy.

Support and advocate for applicable legislation, including increased funding and wise use of Connecticut Energy Efficiency Funds.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, planning, funding, construction, taxes, Taxes, policy, government efficiency, and energy

We are very happy with our decision to install an electric heat pump. We did not have air conditioning before. Our house is more comfortable now, in

both the summer and winter. And, while our electric bill has gone up, our natural gas/oil bill is virtually zero. Max?
Tagged Interests: Fossil Fuels - Oil, electric, and natural gas

DRAFT June 16, 2020

225 185

213 175

150

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100 150 200 250

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Energy Assistance ( )

Tagged Interests: energy

Residential Indicators

1. Residential Participation is the of West Hartford s households that have participated in EnergizeCT energy efficiency programs like Homes Energy

Solutions, Home Energy Solutions-Income Eligible and Residential New Construction. Source: EnergizeCT.
Tagged Interests: construction, program, government efficiency, and energy

4 8

14 17 20

30

2 3 3 4 5 10

0

10

20

30

40

Residential Participation Rebates ( )

Participation

Rebates

3. Energy Assistance is the number of applications for energy assistance by West Hartford Social Services each year. Source: Town of West Hartford,

Social Services. Need s made up
Tagged Interests: social services, services, and energy

2. Residential Rebates is the of West Hartford s households that have received an energy rebate for installing an qualifying project or equipment.

This is lower than Residential Participation, meaning that not all households that participate in an initial home assessment do follow-on energy efficiency projects. Source: EnergizeCT.
Tagged Interests: equipment, government efficiency, and energy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Commercial 28 of West Hartford s energy use is Commercial This sector includes retail shopping and services, offices, schools, health care, food

establishments, lodging , and others. Any industrial or manufacturing is also counted in Commercial.
Tagged Interests: health, industrial, services, commercial, education, and energy

The Commercial sector differs from Residential. There are fewer often larger properties and fewer owners, including corporations, management

companies and the town itself. Building energy systems may be centralized and have high, peak demand at certain times of the day. Space heating is typically natural gas, and represents about 25 of building use. Leases or other contractual arrangements can make it complicated to align the energy and capital improvement interests of owners and tenants.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, leasing, capital spending, Capital Spending, natural gas, rental, commercial, and energy

Like Residential, there are a wide range of energy incentive and financing programs available to commercial property owners to make measures such as

lighting, building controls and HVAC upgrades more achievable and profitable. Programs are available for existing buildings and new construction, as well as for regular businesses, non-profits, institutional, and municipal customers. Some projects like LED lighting can reduce energy use by over 50 - and pay for themselves quickly, yielding a high return on investment. These shorter- payback measures can be packaged with more expensive capital items for more comprehensive energy upgrades.
Tagged Interests: nonprofit, Homebuilder, construction, business, program, property, investment, commercial, energy, and incentive

The town has tried to lead by example, using utility programs to implement over 5 Million of energy efficiency projects across the portfolio of

municipal properties in the last 4 years. These projects, including LED interior, exterior, and street lights and building control system upgrades have helped reduce municipal electricity use by 25 and total energy use by 16.5 from 2015-2019.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, streets, utility, Utility, program, streetscape, government efficiency, energy, and traffic

New commercial development and construction is also an area where the town can . In 2016, Charter Oak International Academy was rebuilt to LEED Gold

green building standards with a geo-thermall/ electric heat pump system for heating and colling nd solar. This schools is the district s top energy perforamce with an energy use idex, or energy use per sf in the the low 30 s kBtis/sf.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, construction, development, electric, Development, commercial, education, and energy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Commercial Progress Goals Benefits Lower energy bills More comfortable, healthy working,

Tagged Interests: commercial and energy

educational environment Reduced need for energy generation Greater security and resiliency during

Tagged Interests: security, Conservation, environment, and energy

extreme weather Lower CO2 and greenhouse gas emissions Local job creation Enhanced public image

Tagged Interests: job creation

2022 Goals 40 business participation in EnergizeCT

Tagged Interests: business

programs 25 reduction in municipal energy use At least 6 drop in commercial energy use 2 new C-PACE projects

Tagged Interests: program, commercial, and energy

Long-Term Goals 100 business participation in EnergizeCT

Tagged Interests: business

programs Multiple C-PACE projects 50 drop in commercial energy use,

Tagged Interests: program, commercial, and energy

including municipal

Progress To Date 28 of businesses participate in EnergizeCT

Tagged Interests: business

efficiency programs 2 C-PACE projects Over 5 Million of energy efficiency projects

Tagged Interests: program, government efficiency, and energy

implemented in municipal buildings with savings over 1 Million annually.

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder

15 reduction in total municipal energy use since 2013

Tagged Interests: energy

Direct mail efforts in partnership with vendors and CT Green Bank

Approach 1. Outreach Engagement. Increase awareness of programs and benefits. Share results. Use word of mouth and B2B network. Work with partners

like Chamber of Commerce, Community Development, neighborhood business associations, CT Green Bank, design professionals, contractors, utilities, etc.
Tagged Interests: contractor, construction, business, utility, development, Utility, program, Development, neighborhood, and community development

2. Participation Adoption. Promote Small Business Energy Advantage, C-PACE, LEED, Energy Star, and other commercial energy efficiency or

certification programs . Encourage the formation of green teams in buildings and tracking of energy use.. Meet with individual property owners and companies. Identify and address barriers (e.g., financing, privacy). Have local businesses and town share their success stories, projects, and experience.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, business, program, small business, property, commercial, government efficiency, privacy, and energy

3. Policy Planning. Investigate use of municipal building, tax codes, procurement, standards and recognition programs to accelerate efficiency. Work

towards zero-energy new construction policy. Advocate for increased funding and wise use of Connecticut Energy Efficiency Funds. Support applicable legislation (e.g., High Performance Building Standards).
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, planning, funding, recognition, construction, taxes, Taxes, program, performance, purchasing, policy, government efficiency, and energy

Aiken Elementary School s annual electric use (kWh) has dropped X since installing LEDs. There is also a noticeable drop in demand. (KW). We are

savings about 2000 a month. Our classrooms have brighter, more consistent light, and maintenance cost have virtually disappeared. Results are similar in other buildings. It s a win-win. Catherine Diviney, Energy Specialist , West Hartford.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, electric, education, and energy

DRAFT June 16, 2020

Commercial Indicators

Tagged Interests: commercial

1. Commercial Participation is the of West Hartford s businesses (including municipal) that have participated in any energy efficiency programs.

Source: EnergizeCT.
Tagged Interests: business, program, commercial, government efficiency, and energy

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