CT - Windsor: REGULAR MEETING

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REGULAR MEETING

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044 A Please call: 312 626 6799 or 646 558 8656 1. When prompted for participant or meeting ID enter: 860 8388 8004 then press 2. You will then enter the meeting muted. During Public Comment if you wish to speak press *9 to raise your hand. Joining in bp Computer: Please go to the following link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86083888004

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Tagged Interests: communications and Communications

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7:30 PM Regular Council Meeting

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ROLL CALL PRAYER OR REFLECTION Councilor Black Burke

Tagged Interests: religion

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE - Councilor Black Burke

PROCLAMATIONS/AWARDS
Tagged Interests: recognition

PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS AND PETITIONS

(Three minute limit per speaker) COMMUNICATIONS FROM COUNCIL MEMBERS
Tagged Interests: council, communications, and Communications

REPORT OF APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions and appointments

a) b) c) d)

No additional detail provided

Board of Education Public Building Commission Human Relations Commission Metropolitan District Commission

TOWN MANAGER'S REPORT
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, boards and commissions, manager, and education

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES

ORDINANCES Mgr Regular.doc
Tagged Interests: ordinance

Town Council Agenda Windsor Town Hall July 6, 2020

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UNFINISHED BUSINESS a) *Approve proposed Capital Improvement Program for Fiscal Years 2021-2026 (Town Manager) NEW BUSINESS a) b) c) d) f) g)

Tagged Interests: business, economic development, capital spending, Capital Spending, program, and manager

*Authorize acceptance and expenditure of grant funds for the Archer Road Rehabilitation Project with the Town Council acting in lieu of a Special Town Meeting per Executive Order 7S (Town Manager)

*Introduce a bond ordinance entitled, AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION.
Tagged Interests: road, funding, grant, ordinance, finance, council, streets, bond, fire departments and districts, and manager

*Set a Public Hearing for August 3, 2020 at 7:25 p.nm (prevailing time) to hear an ordinance entitled, AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION. (Town Manager)

Tagged Interests: funding, ordinance, finance, bond, fire departments and districts, hearing, and manager

*Approve an appropriation of 155,000 for Poquonock Fire Station Roof Project (Town Manager)

Tagged Interests: funding, fire departments and districts, and manager

*Consider amendment to assessment abatement policy to add multi-family housing as eligible use (Town Manager)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: abatement, manager, policy, and housing

*Receive report on Wilson Redevelopment Survey (Town Manager)

Consider settlement of Walgreens vs. Town of Windsor (Town Manager)
Tagged Interests: pharmacy, manager, and settlement

*RESIGNATIONS AND APPOINTMENTS

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions and appointments

MINUTES OF PRECEDING MEETINGS

a) *Minutes of the June 15, 2020 Regular Town Council Meeting

PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS AND PETITIONS

(Three minute limit per speaker)
Tagged Interests: communications and Communications

EXECUTIVE SESSION

ADJOURNMENT *Back up Included Mgr Regular-doc Date: Prepared By: Subj ect: Back ound Agenda Item Summary

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

Peter Souza, Town Manager Capital Improvement Program for FY 2021-2026 The town's six year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) provides a means for coordinating and prioritizing the capital project requests of various departments and agencies. FY 2021-2026 includes proj ect descriptions and projected costs by fiscal year.
Tagged Interests: council, capital spending, Capital Spending, program, and manager

Discussion/Analysis The 6-year CIP provides a means for coordinating and prioritizing the capital project requests of various departments and agencies. The information that the CIP provides regarding the short- term and long-term financial impacts of undertaking projects enables policy makers to balance town priorities with the town's financial capability to pay for the desired projects.

Historically, Windsor has adhered to recommended best practices in order to maintain a debt burden that is in line with available resources. Windsor holds its total debt service requirement to within 8 of total operating expenditures. This is consistent with recommendations from bond rating agencies that debt service be held to within 5 to 15 of the total operating budget. In recent years, borrowing has been structured to allow for the relatively quick retirement of outstanding debt. Below are a few highlights of the proposed CIP: The proposed CIP forecasts 42.9 million in bonding authorization. The 6-year CIP cycle includes two projects that would require voter approval due to estimated costs. These projects are o Town Facility Improvements Outdoor Pool Facilities o BOE Windsor High School Heating and Ventilation System Replacement The CIP includes approximately 8.3 million for street resurfacing, pavement reclamation, milling, curb replacement, minor drainage improvements and other pavement repair work. In addition, the 6 year period includes major street reconstruction or rehabilitation projects at an estimated cost of 13.4 million. Of the total 21.7 million included for the asset management of town roadways, 6.7 million is planned to come from state and/or federal funding sources. Projected debt service ratios based on a five-year financial forecast, inclusive of all projects requiring voter referendum, are not projected to exceed the 8 policy goal in any year of the proposed CIP. The proposed CIP identifies 17.4 million in cash-funded projects. The sources for cash funding projects are primarily appropriations from the annual General Fund as well as requests for monies from the Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund balance and the General Fund Unassigned Fund Balance. The Capital Projects Fund source fluctuates from year to year as that fund is comprised of closed out balances from completed projects. Outdoor Pool Facilities projects (Goslee and Welch) have the design phase in FY 21 and construction phase in FY 23. Renovations to Veterans Pool is curently unscheduled. These projects may require voter referendum depending on the scope of work and phasing approach. An annual General Fund appropriation of 500,000 is proposed to be dedicated to Public Safety projects to reduce long-term borrowing. Projects include replacement of fire apparatus and fire station HVAC system replacements. Several large projects at Sage Park Middle School are incorporated over the 6 year period. Projects range from roof replacement, heating and mechanical equipment replacements to the installation of air-conditioning systems. Financial Impact The debt service ratios are inclusive of the voter approved Public Safety Complex project and the town-wide radio system, as well as the other potential referendum projects in the CIP. The financing assumptions used to calculate the debt service ratios include a combination of both long-term general obligation bonds and short-term notes. As a result of this, the debt service ratios are projected to not exceed the 8 policy goal in any year of the CIP.
Tagged Interests: pavement, funding, construction, equipment, finance, veterans, radio, facility, streets, budget, retirement, capital spending, bond, public safety, fire departments and districts, Capital Spending, seniors, parks, education, policy, referendum, and stormwater

Other Board Action The Capital Improvements Committee completed their review of the proposed CIP on May 28th. The Committee voted to recommend that the proposed FY 2021-2026 CIP be approved with the suggestion that Fire Station Vehicle Exhaust System project, if possible, be moved from FY 22 to FY21.

The Town Improvements Committee met on June 22, 2020 and recommended that the Town Council approve the proposed FY 2021-2026 Capital Improvements program as presented. Recommendations Ifthe Town Council is in agreement, the following motion is recomrnended for approval:
Tagged Interests: council, boards and commissions, capital spending, fire departments and districts, Capital Spending, and program

MOVE that the proposed FY 2021-2026 Capital Improvements Plan be approved as presented.

Attachments 6-Year CIP Schedule and Unscheduled Projects List Draft FY 2021-2026 Capital Improvement Program online at: h ://townofwindsorct.com/finance/documents/2021-2026-ci -draft/ Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital improvements Committee
Tagged Interests: finance, capital spending, Capital Spending, and program

New Bonding Authorization

Landfill Leachate Management Wilson Route 159 Corridor Enhancement Program (Phase l)

Tagged Interests: landfill, bond, solid waste, program, and corridor

Day Hill Road Ped. Circulation Enhancements (Marshall Phelps to Orange Way) Town Facility Improvements - DPW Fuel Station Improvements (Design) Town Facility Improvements - Milo Peck HVAq Electrical Energy improvements (Design Construction) Town Facility Improvements - Luddy House and Carriage House Windows and Doors Replacement

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: road, construction, facility, streets, and energy

Town Facility Improvements - Poquonock Fire Station Roof Replacement (Construction)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: construction, facility, and fire departments and districts

Town Facility Improvements - Wilson Fire Station HVAC Replacement (Construction)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: construction, facility, and fire departments and districts

Town Facility Improvements - Data Centers Storage

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: facility

Poquonock Fire Station - Engine 7 Replacement

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: fire departments and districts

Firehouse Vehicle Exhaust Systems

Broad Street Signal Modifications and Road Diet (Design) Phase II

Tagged Interests: road, streets, and diet

Town Facility Improvements - Outdoor Pool Improvements (Welch and Goslee Facility Designs)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: facility

Athietic Field Improvements - Sage Park Middle School West Field Improvements (Design)

BOE - Sage Park Middle School - Roof Repairs and Partial Roof Replacement BOE - Technology Equipment Upgrades BOE - Sage Park Middie School Alternative Energy and Efficiencies Upgrades (Construction - Phase 1)

Tagged Interests: construction, equipment, Technology, parks, technology, education, and energy

Subtotal FY 2021

FY 2021 Proiects Anticipated to Require Voter Approval Project Name FY 2021 Pavement Management Program Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement 680,000 Pavement Resurfacing at Town Facilities Schools 240,000 287,500 270,000 165,000 165,000 505,000 505,000 120,100 200,000905,000 705,000 150,000 150,000 150,000150,000 Estimated Project Cost 150,000 751400 200,000 92,800 80,000 2t705tooo 147631200 14,763,200 General Fund 850,000 150,000 680,000 80,000 2,4101000 240,000 2,255.000 200,000 State Federal Aid 180,000 985,000 2, 171 ,300 Enterprise Funds

Tagged Interests: pavement, funding, equipment, streets, program, Public Works, public works, education, and Pedestrian

1
,406, 100

1
100

None.

subtotal FY 2021

GRAND TOTAL FY 2021

Capital Projects Fund Assigned Balance (Total =

Tagged Interests: capital spending and Capital Spending

2
Genera/ Fund Unassigned (Total = 75,400)

Other Sources

17,500 75,400 70,000 120,100 92,800 375t800 375,800

300, 400)

Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital Improvements Committee New Bonding AuthorizationProject Name Estimated Project Cost FY 2022 Pavement Management Program 1 ,085tooo 753,400 500,000 100,000 121 General Fund 905,000 State Federal Aid 180,000 1229,800 1,229,800 Enterprise Funds Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program Stormwater Management Improvements Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement Tree Replacement Program
Tagged Interests: pavement, funding, equipment, streets, capital spending, bond, Capital Spending, program, trees, Public Works, public works, Pedestrian, and stormwater

Historic Monument and Ancient Cemetery Preservation

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: historic, preservation, and monuments

Town Facility Improvements - DPW Fuel Station.lmprovements (Construction) Wilson Route 159 Corridor Enhancement Program (Phase II)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: construction, facility, program, and corridor

Day Hill Road Ped. Circulation Enhancements (Marshall Phelps to Helmsford Way, Design)

River Street Roadway Rehabilitation (Poquonock to Old River, Design)

Tagged Interests: road, streets, and watershed

?iqeon Hill Road Rehabilitation (Lamberton Rd to Addison Rd, Desigp).

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: road and streets

Athletic Field Improvements - Sage Park Middle School West Field Improvements (Construction)

Public Safety Fqkjpment Fund BOE - Technology Equipment Upgrades BOE - Sage Park Middle School - Alternative Enp.rgy and Efficiencif? ypgrades (Construction Phase 2) BOE - Clover Street School - ADA Code and Restroom Renovations (Design)

Tagged Interests: construction, equipment, streets, disability, public safety, Technology, parks, technology, education, and athletics

BOE Clover Street School - Roof Replacement (Design)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: streets and education

Subtotal FY 2022

FY 2022 Projects Anticipated to Require Voter Approval None

Subtotal FY 2022

GRAND TOTAL FY 2022 Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund Balance (Total = 160,000 269,000 735,000 30,000 50,000 23,400 58,440 51,600

Tagged Interests: capital spending and Capital Spending

1
734200

2, 110,000 45,500 8,876,640 160,000 269,000 735,000 753,400

1
,734200

500,000 100,000 2, 1101000 121,300 48661600 4,866,600

Other Sources

50,000 23,400 58,440 45,500 258,940 258,940

258, 940)

Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital Improvements Committee New Bonding AuthorizationProject Name FY 2023 Pavement Management Program 9051000 Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program 1751000175,000 Stormwater Management Improvements 274, 100 274 Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement 735,000 735,000 Pavement Resurfacing at Town Facilities Schools 260,000 260,000 202,600 135,000 135,000 115,000 192,300 208,000 208,000 292,000 292,000 105,000 State Federal Aid 180,000 4,772,400 4,772,400 Enterprise Funds
Tagged Interests: pavement, funding, equipment, streets, capital spending, bond, Capital Spending, program, Public Works, public works, education, Pedestrian, and stormwater

Pigeon Hill Road Rehabilitation (Lamberton to Addison Rd, Construction)

River Street Roadway Rehabilitation (Poquonock to Od River, Construction) Day Hitl Road Capacity Improvements Lane Widening from Addison Road to 1-91 (Design).

Tagged Interests: road, construction, streets, and watershed

Day Hi l Road Pedestrian Circulation Enhancements (Marshall Phelps to Helmsford, Construction)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: road, construction, streets, and Pedestrian

Broad Street Road Diet (Construction)

Town Facility Improvements LP Wilson Boiler Replacement (Design) Palisado Avenue Corridor Improvements and Wall Repairs (Design)

Tagged Interests: road, construction, facility, streets, corridor, and diet

Athletic Field Master Plan Implementation Sharshon Park Improvements (Design)

Town Facility Improvements NW Park Parking Lot Renovations Wilson Fire Station Replace Brush Truck Public Safety Equipment Fund BOE - Technology Equipment Upgrades BOE - Sage Park Middle School - Alternative Energy and Efficiencies Upgrades (Construction - Phase 3)

Tagged Interests: construction, equipment, facility, public safety, fire departments and districts, transportation, Technology, technology, education, athletics, energy, and parking

Subtotal FY 2023

FY 2023 Projects Anticipated to Require Voter Approval Town Facility Improvements Outdoor Pool Improvements (Welch and Goslee Facility Renovations, Const.) Estimated Project Cost 665,000 642,080 450,000 261,000

Tagged Interests: facility

1
05f000

2, 195,000 3t645,ooo General Fund 99, 700 2,654700 665,000 642,080 450,000 2611000 115,000 2, 1951000 180 3,645,000

316451000Subtotal FY 2023

GRAND TOTAL FY 2023 Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund Balance (Total =

Tagged Interests: capital spending and Capital Spending

Other Sources

102,900 192,300 295,200 295,200 295,200) Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital Improvements Committee Project Name FY 2024
Tagged Interests: capital spending, Capital Spending, and program

Pavement Management Program 925,000

Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program 180,000 Stormwater Management Improvements 324,000 750,000 750,000 1621000 100,000 210,000 105,000 Estimated Project Cost New Bonding Authorization 324,000 162,000 210,000 2, 132800 77,000 214,300 State Federal Aid 180,000 180,000 180,000 Enterprise Funds Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement Tree Replacement Program Construct Sidewalks Local Roads Within 1 Mile of School
Tagged Interests: pavement, road, funding, equipment, streets, bond, program, trees, Public Works, public works, education, Pedestrian, and stormwater

Historic Monument and Ancient Cemetery Preservation

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: historic, preservation, and monuments

Day Hill Road Ped. Circulation Enhancements (Old Day Hill Roadl

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: road and streets

Street Reconstruction - Basswood Road (Design).

Street Rehabilitation - International Drive (Design) Design)

Tagged Interests: road and streets

Town Facility Improvements - LP Wilson Boiler Replacement (Construction)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: construction and facility

Town Facility Improvements - 330 Windsor Ave. - Energy Recovery Improvements (Design)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: facility and energy

Athletic Field Improvements - Clover Street School Field improvements (Design)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: streets, education, and athletics

Athletic Field Improvements - OBrien Field Turf Replacement (Design)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: athletics

Public Safety Equipment Fund - Replace Engine 1

BOE - Technology kquipment Upgrades BOE - Clover Street School - ADA Code and Restroom Renovations (Construction)

Tagged Interests: construction, equipment, streets, disability, public safety, Technology, technology, and education

1
, 105,000

180,000 351000 26,000 82,000 21132,800 28,100

77
,ooo

65,000 996,000

1
,363T200

280,800 44,500 8,066,400 General Fund 82,000 2, 542,000

BOE - Windsor High School - HVAC Systems Replacement (Design) BOE - L.P. Wilson - ADA Code and Restroom Renovations (Design)

Tagged Interests: disability and education

Subtotal FY 2024

FY 2024 Projects Anticipated to Require Voter Approval None

Subtotal FY 2024

GRAND TOTAL FY 2024

Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund Balance (Total = 265, 100) 2 General Fund Unassigned Fund Balance (Total = 100, 000)

Public Safety Equipment Fund (Total = 496, 000)
Tagged Interests: equipment, capital spending, public safety, and Capital Spending

Other Sources

35,000 100,000 26,000 28t100 65,000 496,000 66,500 861,100 861,100 Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital Improvements Committee Project Name FY 2025 Pavement Management Program Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement Pavement Resurfacing at Town Facilities Schools 280,000 635,000 280,000280,000 220,000 220,000 110,000 110,000
Tagged Interests: pavement, equipment, streets, capital spending, Capital Spending, program, Public Works, public works, education, and Pedestrian

New Bonding Authorization

280,000 325,000 280,000 2,143,300 635,000

Tagged Interests: bond

1
,479, 100

197,400 4,435,000 4,435,000 State Federal Aid 180,000 180,000 180,000 Enterprise Funds
Tagged Interests: funding

Town Facility Improvements - 330 Windsor Ave. Energy Recovery improvements (Construction)

Town Hall Roof Replacement Project (Design)

Tagged Interests: construction, facility, and energy

Day Hill Road Ped. Circulation Enhancements (Old Day Hill Road, Construction)

Street Rehabilitation - International Drive (Construction)

Tagged Interests: road, construction, and streets

Street Reconstruction Basswood Road (Construction)

Construct Sidewalks Arterial Roads River Street Repair Culvert and Stream Bed (Design)

Tagged Interests: road, construction, streets, watershed, Pedestrian, and stormwater

Athletic Field Master Plan - Sharshon Park Improvements

Athletic Field Improvement O'Brien Field Turf Replacement (Construction)

Tagged Interests: construction, parks, and athletics

Public Safety Fund Wilson Firehouse Interior Renovations and Roof Replacement

Tagged Interests: public safety

Public Safety Fund FD Utility / Mobile Cascade Vehicle Replacement

BOE - Technology Equipment Upgrades
Tagged Interests: equipment, utility, Utility, public safety, fire departments and districts, Technology, and technology

BOE - Windsor High School Fieldhouse Renovation (Design)

Tagged Interests: education

Subtotal FY 2025

FY 2025 Pro'ects Antici ated to Re uire Voter A roval

BOE - Windsor High School HVAC Systems Replacement (Construction)

Estimated Project Cost IT105,ooo 200,000 750,000 280,000 325rooo 29,300
Tagged Interests: construction and education

1
F055,ooo

2, 143,300 63,000 76,400

1
100

63,000 9,094, 100 4,435,000

Subtotal FY 2025

GRAND TOTAL FY 2025

Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund Balance (Total

General Fund 925,000 200,000 750,000 26,400 2,511 ,400 2,511 ,400
Tagged Interests: capital spending and Capital Spending

Other Sources

29,300 63,000 50,000 63,000 205f300 205,300

205, 300)

Draft Capital Improvement Program To be reviewed by Capital Improvements Committee
Tagged Interests: capital spending, Capital Spending, and program

Project Name Estimated Project Cost

FY 2026 Pavement Management Program Sidewalk and Curb Replacement Program 200,000 Fleet and Public Works Equipment Replacement 775,000
Tagged Interests: pavement, equipment, streets, program, Public Works, public works, and Pedestrian

Public Safety Eqy)pment - Ladder Truck 1 Replacement

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: public safety and transportation

Tree Replacement Program 40,000

Tagged Interests: program and trees

Town Hali Roof Replacment (Construction) 555, 000

Tagged Interests: construction

River Street - Repair Culvert and Stream Bed (Construction) 687,900

110,000

Tagged Interests: construction, streets, watershed, and stormwater

New Bonding Authorization

7901000 555,000 687,900 879,800 960,000 6, 179,300 43,068,780 State Federal Aid 180,000 1801000 180,000 Enterprise FundsGeneral Fund 930,000 200,000 775,000 500,000

Tagged Interests: bond

110,oooBOE Technolpgy.kqyi_pmept. BOE - Clover Street Roof Replacement (Construction)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: construction and streets

BOE - L.P. Wilson - ADA Code and Restroom Renovations (Construction)

BOE Windsor High School Fieldhouse Renovation (Construction)

Tagged Interests: construction, disability, and education

Subtotal FY 2025

FY 2026 Pro ects Antici None

Subtotal FY 2025

GRAND TOTAL FY 2025 ated to Re uire Voter A roval 2,306,600 879,800 960,000 9,030,300 Capital Projects Fund Assigned Fund Balance (Total -

Tagged Interests: capital spending and Capital Spending

- 40, 000) 2 Public safety Equipment Fund ( 116,000)

Total CIP Program

Tagged Interests: equipment, capital spending, public safety, Capital Spending, and program

Other Sources

116,000 40,000 156,000 156,000 2,152,340 List of Unscheduled Projects FY21 FY26 ctP Estimated Cost* Road Reconstruction/ Transportation System Projects Archer Road Safety Improvements Audible Pedestrian Crosswalk Signals
Tagged Interests: road, streets, transportation, and Pedestrian

Baker Hollow Road -Street Reconstruction

Construct Sidewalks Along Arteriai Roads Construct Sidewalks Along Collector Roads

Tagged Interests: road, streets, and Pedestrian

Construct Sidewalks Within 1 Mile of Schoofs

Tagged Interests: streets and Pedestrian

Day Hill Road Capacity Improvements - Lane Widening from Addison Rd to 1-91 (Const.) Day HiEE Road Capacity - Right Turn Lanes

Day Hill Road/Btue Hills Ave. Extension Roundabout Construction

Tagged Interests: traffic circle, road, construction, and streets

Intersection Improvements at Capen Street and Sage Park Road

Pafisado Avenue Corridor Improvements and Walt Repair (Construction) Pedestrian Bridge Over Railroad Tracks - Windsor Center
Tagged Interests: bridge, road, construction, streets, parks, corridor, and Pedestrian

Pond Road/lndian Hlll Road Street Reconstruction Rainbow Road Street Reconstruction

River Street Roadway RehabiEItation (Kennedy Rd to Old River St) Route 305 Corridor Improvements

Tagged Interests: road, streets, watershed, and corridor

Sidewalk Installation - Poquonock Avenue (MarshalE Stto Tiffany Or) Traffic Signat at Windsor Avenue and Corey Street

Subtotal

Tagged Interests: streets, Pedestrian, and traffic

Community Facilities and Assets Town FaciEity Improvements - Luddy House Fire Protection Installation Town Facility Improvements - LP Wilson Kitchen Renovations

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: facility

Town hall Domestic Water Piping Replacement LP Wilson Window Replacement Town Hal] Stairway Railings

Tagged Interests: utility, Utility, and water

Town Facility Improvements - Chaffee House Roof Replacement

Freight House Repointing of Brick Stone Ext, Walls Train Station Boiler Repiacement Replacement Emergency Power Generators

Tagged Interests: facility and emergency

Silver Birch Pond Improvements

Veterans Memorial Cemetery Expansion Enhancements Wilson Branch Library Roof Replacement LP Wilson - LED Lighting Conversion LP Wilson Auditorium Improvements Project Windsor Library Roof Replacement Milo Peck Roof Replacement
Tagged Interests: veterans, expansion, and library

LP Wilson Gym Air Conditioning Project Town Facility Improvements - Poquonock fire Station HVAC Replacement Reconstruct Pleasant Street Boat Launch

Tagged Interests: facility, streets, fire departments and districts, and boating

Town Facility Improvements - Milo Peck Restroom RenovaMons

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: facility

Town Facility Improvements - Roger Wolcott Roof Replacement

Streetlight Replacement, Energy, and Maint. Cost Reduction Program Town Center Parking Garage Subtotal 682,900 31,200 281,900 655,100 886,900 243,300 537,000

Tagged Interests: facility, program, energy, and parking

83
00 50,000

53,000 60,000 88,000 93,500 127,000 128,500 132,000 153,000 154,800 165,000 181,712 207,000 215,000 295,000 430,000 488,500 494,100 529,826 Design FY25 Design FY23 Design FY23 State/FederaI Funds State/FederaE Funds Pavement Management Ongoing Subtotal Public Safety Additionaf Fire Hydrants

Tagged Interests: pavement, funding, and public safety

Poquonock Fire Station - Rescue Pumper 8 Replacement

Subtotal Park Improvements

Tagged Interests: fire departments and districts and parks

Athletic Field Improvements - Clover Street School

Athletic Field Improvements Fitch Park Athletic Field Emprovements Northwest Park Estimated Cost* 965,400 989,200 500,200 534,700 247,900 188,100 283,500 Design FY24

Tagged Interests: streets, parks, education, and athletics

Athletic Field Improvements - Welch Park

Northwest Park Activity Pavilion Outdoor Pool Facilities improvements Parks Improvements - Master Plan

Tagged Interests: parks and athletics

Riverfront Trail Project - Windscr Center to E.

Stormwater Management Improvements None 1-91 Ramp Improvements Barber Subtotat Subtotal Ramp Modification at 1-91 Route 751Day Hill Road Subtotal Board of Education

Tagged Interests: road, boards and commissions, streets, trails, education, and stormwater

Oliver Ellsworth School - Code Compliance Upgrades

Poquonock School Roof Repfacement Project School Emergency Power Generators SchooE Windows Replacement Windsor High School Roof Replacement Project Subtotal Veterans Pool 55,000 274,100 152,000 * Estimate in current dollars: Includes 20 contingency and 1.5 bonding costs Date: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Background Agenda Item Summary

Tagged Interests: veterans, bond, emergency, compliance, and education

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

Tagged Interests: council

Robett A. Jarvis, P.E. Director of Public Works / Town Engineer

Peter Souza, Town Manager

Tagged Interests: Public Works, public works, and manager

Archer Road Rehabilitation - Request for Authorization of Spending and Execution of the Project Authorization Letter for Construction

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: road, construction, and streets

In 2018, the town was awarded grant funding through the Connecticut Department of Transportation's (CT DOT) Local Transportation Capital Improvement Program (LOTCIP) for the pavement rehabilitation of Archer Road. The LOTCIP program provides 100 state funding for the construction phase of the project.

Tagged Interests: pavement, road, funding, grant, construction, streets, capital spending, Capital Spending, transportation, and program

Discussion/Analysis The final design for the reconstruction project has been submitted to, and approved by, CT DOT. At this time, the town needs to execute the Project Authorization Letter (PAL) associated with the town's Master Municipal Agreement (MMA) for construction projects with the CT DOT. The MMA for construction projects covers the standard non-project specific provisions, including all required state and federal rules and regulations. These include administration procedures, procurement procedures, inspection requirements, construction standards, and reimbursement procedures while the PAL includes project specific information.

The PAL for the Archer Road Rehabilitation project includes a total estimated construction cost of 1,940,868, with the construction phase of the project being funded 100 by the state. Upon the receipt of construction bids, the state will transfer money in the amount of the low bid plus an additional 20 to cover incidental construction inspection and administration, material testing, and other miscellaneous costs. When the project is complete, any remaining funds are to be returned to the state. The project will be bid mid-summer and work is expected to be substantially completed by late-fall. At this time, staff is respectfully requesting that the Council authorize the Town Manager to sign the PAL and authorize the acceptance of state grant ftmds and expenditure of the funds for the project.
Tagged Interests: rfp, road, RFP, funding, grant, regulation, construction, council, streets, transportation, procedure, purchasing, and manager

Financial Impact The project's estimated costs are as follows:

Construction Contingencies Incidentals to Construction Total Project Cost 161,739 161 a 39 traffic control) The construction phase of the project will be entirely funded by state monies, with no demand deposit or town share of the construction cost. In October 2018, the Town Council appropriated 65,000 for design services. A Special Town Meeting is required to authorize the acceptance of state grant funds and expenditure of funds for the project and to authorize the Town Manager to sign the supplemental PAL as the total cost exceeds the Town Charter threshold of 1 of the tax pursuant Section 9- 3(a). In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Lamont has issued a series of Executive Orders. Executive Order 7-S requires the suspension of in-person voting requirements for certain time sensitive municipal financial decisions, including supplemental, additional or special appropriations pursuant to Section 7-348 of the General Statutes or any similar municipal charter requirement. This Executive Order was subsequently amended by Executive Order 7-CC, Paragraph 1 to include the application for or acceptance of any grants, funding, or gifts. The Town Council needs to make specific findings that these actions are necessary to permit the orderly operation of the municipality, prevent significant financial loss, and that there is a need to act immediately. There are two primary reasons to act immediately. The first is to ensure that construction can commence and be completed this season. The second being to prevent the potential financial loss of the state grant if the project is not authorized and construction does not commence this summer due to the uncertainty of state finances caused by the COVID- 19 pandemic.
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, funding, grant, construction, finance, council, voting, taxes, Taxes, services, manager, and traffic

Other Board Action The Town Planning Zoning Commission will be requested to accept the project, pursuant to the provisions of Section 8-24, at its regularly scheduled meeting of July 14, 2020.

Tagged Interests: planning, boards and commissions, zoning, and housing

Recommendations If the Town Council is in agreement, the following motions are recommended for approval:

Tagged Interests: council

Approve Findings Per Executive Order 7S

No additional detail provided

MOVE, that per Executive Order 7S, the Windsor Town Council finds that to prevent possible financial loss and permit the orderly operation of the municipality the Town Council, as the town's legislative body, is acting in lieu of the Special Town Meeting, with regard to the First Supplemental Project Authorization Letter for the Archer Road Rehabilitation Project, Project No. L164-0005, under Master Agreement No. 02.28-02

Motion to Approve Acceptance and Expenditure of Grant Funds RESOLVED that Peter Souza, Town Manager, be authorized to sign the Project Authorization Letter for the Archer Road Rehabilitation Project, Project No. L164-0006, under Master Agreement No. 02.28-02 (13). And MOVE to accept funds from the State of Connecticut and authorize the expenditure of these funds for the Archer Road Rehabilitation Proj ect. Date: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Background Agenda Item Summary

Tagged Interests: road, funding, grant, finance, council, streets, and manager

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

Tagged Interests: council

Robert A. Jarvis, P.E. Director of Public Works / Town Engineer

Peter Souza, Town Manager Introduction of a Bond Ordinance for Construction Services for Wilson Fire Station HVAC Replacement Project. The Wilson Fire Station was built in 1995. The existing HVAC equipment and controls are original to the building and they are approaching the end of their expected life cycle.

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, ordinance, construction, equipment, bond, fire departments and districts, services, Public Works, public works, and manager

Discussion/Analysis The construction project will include the replacement of the existing gas-fired roof top unit, air zoning distribution VA V boxes, apparatus bay infrared heaters, and existing HVAC controls.

An existing interior storage room is available and will be used as a mechanical room to house the new equipment. Energy efficient gas-fired low-condensing boilers, a new air handler, new apparatus bay infrared heaters, with new DDC controls will be installed. The new HVAC systems will be easier to service and achieve higher energy efficiencies. The Public Building Commission has bid and approved this project. If authorized, construction would occur late summer into the fall. This project is in the Capital Improvements Program (CIP) for the current fiscal year. Financial Impact
Tagged Interests: rfp, Homebuilder, RFP, construction, equipment, finance, boards and commissions, capital spending, zoning, Capital Spending, program, and energy

The bid costs for the project are as follows:

Construction Bonding Contingency Total 305,000 5,000

Tagged Interests: rfp, RFP, construction, and bond

30
000

340,000 The requested bonding amount is 340,000 including issuance costs. The average annual debt service on 340,000, based on a 20 year term at a 3.5 interest rate is 23,500.

Tagged Interests: bond

Due to the increases in efficiencies of the new equipment, it is estimated the fire station's annual operating costs for energy could be reduced by approximately 3,500 to 4,000.

Tagged Interests: equipment, fire departments and districts, and energy

Other Board Action The Public Building Commission (PBC) would be assigned to oversee and manage this project, should funding receive approval.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, funding, and boards and commissions

Recommendations If the Town Council is in agreement, the following motions are recommended for approval:

1) Waiving of the Reading
Tagged Interests: council

RESOLVED, that the reading into the minutes of the text of the ordinance entitled, 'AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION' is hereby waived, the full text of the ordinance having been distributed to each member of the Council and copies being made available to those persons attending this meeting; and that the full text of the ordinance be recorded with the minutes of this meeting.

Tagged Interests: funding, ordinance, finance, council, bond, and fire departments and districts

2) Introduce an Ordinance

MOVE to introduce an ordinance entitled, 'AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION. 3) Set a Public Hearing RESOLVED, that a Public Hearing be held on August 3, 2020 at 7:25 p.m. (prevailing time) on the following ordinance entitled, 'AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION. And

Tagged Interests: funding, ordinance, finance, bond, fire departments and districts, and hearing

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Town Clerk is authorized and directed to post and publish notice of said Public Hearing.

Attachments None AN ORDINANCE APPROPRIATING 340,000 FOR COSTS IN CONNECTION WITH WILSON FIRE STATION HVAC IMPROVEMENTS; AND AUTHORIZING THE ISSUE OF 340,000 BONDS AND NOTES TO FINANCE THE APPROPRIATION BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED, Section 1. That the Town of Windsor appropriate THREE HUNDRED FORTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ( 340,000) for costs in connection with the replacement of existing HVAC equipment at Wilson Fire District, including installation of new equipment and conversion of existing space into a new mechanical room. New equipment will consist of air handler, cooling coil, air exchangers, infrared heaters, DDC Controls, variable refrigerant flow system, duct cleaning, and other related improvements. The appropriation may be spent for construction and installation costs, equipment, materials, engineering, inspection and consultant fees, administrative costs, printing, legal fees, net interest on borrowings and other financing costs, and other expenses related to the project and its financing. The Town Engineer is authorized to determine the scope and particulars of the project and may reduce or modify the project scope, and the entire appropriation may be expended on the project as so reduced or modified. Section 2. That the Town issue bonds or notes in an amount not to exceed THREE HUNDRED FORTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ( 340,000) to finance the appropriation for the project. The amount of bonds or notes authorized to be issued shall be reduced by the amount of grants received by the Town for the project and not separately appropriated to pay additional project costs. The bonds or notes shall be issued pursuant to Section 7-369 of the General Statutes of Connecticut, Revision of 1958, as amended, and any other enabling acts. The bonds or notes shall be general obligations of the Town secured by the inevocable pledge of the full faith and credit of the Town. Section 3. That the Town issue and renew temporary notes from time to time in anticipation of the receipt of the proceeds from the sale of the bonds or notes or the receipt of grants for the project. The amount of the notes outstanding at any time shall not exceed THREE HUNDRED FORTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ( 340,000). The notes shall be issued pursuant to Section 7-378 of the General Statutes of Connecticut, Revision of 1958, as amended. The notes shall be general obligations of the Town and shall be secured by the irrevocable pledge of the full faith and credit of the Town. The Town shall comply with the provisions of Section 7-378a of the General Statutes if the notes do not mature within the time permitted by said Section 7-378. Section 4. That the Town Manager and either the Treasurer or the Director of Finance of the Town shall sign any bonds or notes by their manual or facsimile signatures. The Director of Finance shall keep a record of the bonds and notes. The law firm of Day Pitney LLP is designated as bond counsel to approve the legality of the bonds or notes. The Town Manager and either the Treasurer or the Director of Finance are authorized to determine the amounts, dates, interest rates, maturities, redemption provisions, form and other details of the bonds or notes; to designate one or more banks or trust companies to be the certifying bank, registrar, transfer agent and paying agent for the bonds or notes; to provide for the keeping of a record of the bonds or notes; to designate a financial advisor to the Town in connection with the sale of the bonds or notes; to sell the bonds or notes at public or private sale; to deliver the bonds or notes; and to perform all other acts which are necessary or appropriate to issue the bonds or notes. Section 5. That the Town hereby declares its official intent under Federal Income Tax Regulation Section 1.150-2 that project costs may be paid from temporary advances of available funds and that (except to the extent reimbursed from grant moneys) the Town reasonably expects to reimburse any such advances from the proceeds of borrowings in an aggregate principal amount not in excess of the amount of borrowing authorized above for the project. The Town Manager and either the Treasurer or the Director of Finance are authorized to amend such declaration of official intent as they deem necessary or advisable and to bind the Town pursuant to such representations and covenants as they deem necessary or advisable in order to maintain the continued exemption from federal income taxation of interest on the bonds or notes authorized by this resolution, if issued on a tax-exempt basis, including covenants to pay rebates of investment earnings to the United States in future years. Section 6. That the Town Manager and either the Treasurer or the Director of Finance are authorized to make representations and enter into written agreements for the benefit of holders of the bonds or note to provide secondary market disclosure information, which agreements may include such terms as they deem advisable or appropriate in order to comply with applicable laws or rules pertaining to the sale or purchase of such bonds or notes. Section 7. That the Town Council, the Town Manager, the Treasurer, the Director of Finance, the Director of Public Works and other proper officers and officials of the Town are authorized to take all other action which is necessary or desirable to complete the project and to issue bonds or notes to finance the aforesaid appropriation. APPROVED AS TO FORM: Bond Counsel ATTEST: Town Clerk Distributed to Town Council Public Hearing Advertised Public Hearing Adopted Advertised Effective Date Date: To: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Background Agenda Item Summary

Tagged Interests: impact fee, funding, grant, regulation, ordinance, construction, equipment, finance, council, legal, market, sale, taxes, Taxes, bond, fire departments and districts, materials, advertising, services, purchasing, Public Works, public works, investment, Treasurer, hearing, manager, TREASURER, rates, and engineering

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

Tagged Interests: council

Robelt A. Jarvis, P.E., Director of Public Works / Town Engineer

Peter Souza, Town Manager Funding Authorization for Poquonock Fire Station Roof Replacement Project. The Poquonock Fire Station roofing was originally installed in 1993. The 12,058 square feet of roofing is beyond its useful life expectancy. This project would replace that roofing with a suitable roofing system.

Tagged Interests: funding, fire departments and districts, Public Works, public works, and manager

Discussion/Anal sis There are two different types of roof systems on this building 7,298 pitched square feet of asphalt shingles and 4,760 flat square feet of modified Siplast type.

The proposed project will involve the removal of all existing roofing systems and the installation of new roofing systems in their place. The existing flat roof will have additional insulation installed to reduce energy usage, as well as to increase the slope on the roofto the drains. The asphalt pitched roofs are aged and have signs of deterioration. The flat roof areas are showing signs of failure and are in poor condition. Granules are less than 50 in areas with alligator cracking and other deteriorations.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, drugs, poverty, and energy

Included in the project scope is repair of a portion of the fire suppression system piping that services the apparatus bay area. Estimated cost for this work is 15,000.

Tagged Interests: services

In FY 21 town staff will be exploring opportunities to have solar arrays installed on the roof through a potential power purchase arrangement with a private entity.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: purchasing

Financial Impact If authorized, construction would occur this summer. This project is in the Capital Improvements Program (CIP) for the current fiscal year. Total project costs are 155,000, including contingency. The funding source is FY 2021 General Services budget.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: funding, construction, finance, budget, capital spending, Capital Spending, services, and program

The as-bid costs for the project are as follows:

Construction Bonding Contingency Total 139,000 2,000 14 000 155,000

Tagged Interests: rfp, RFP, construction, and bond

Other Board Action The Public Building Commission (PBC) would be assigned to oversee and manage this project should funding receive approval.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, funding, and boards and commissions

Recommendations If the Town Council is in agreement, the following motion is recommended for approval:

Tagged Interests: council

MOVE that 155,000 be authorized from the FY 2021 General Services Budget for the Poquonock Fire Station Roof Replacement Project and that the project is referred to the Public Building Commission.

Attachments None Certification

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, boards and commissions, budget, fire departments and districts, and services

I
hereby certify that there is 155,000 in the FY 21 General Fund, General Services Budget to fund the above appropriation.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: funding, budget, and services

Li a Collins Assistant Finance Director

Date: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Residential Back round Agenda Item Summary
Tagged Interests: finance

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

James Burke, Economic Develo ment Director Peter Souza, Town Manager Amendment to Fixed Assessment Policy for Multi-family
Tagged Interests: council, manager, and policy

The Economic Development Commission was referred a request from a Daniel Ferraina, a Windsor-based property owner and developer, to have the Town Council consider amending the Assessment Abatement Policy to include new multi-family housing developments as an eligible type of business or land use.

Currently, the Town's adopted policy allows the following eligible uses: manufacturing, class 'A' office space, office for advanced medical procedures, and Significant Fiscal Impact projects, which makes a capital investment in taxable personal property and real estate improvements equal to or greater than 60 million. The abatement policy previously allowed new multi-family residential projects within the Town Center area to be eligible. This was an eligible use for the period of January 2014 through January 3 1, 2017 when the clause sunset. The intent of that amendment was to promote immediate development in the Center to help generate patrons and activity for existing and future small businesses. One project, Windsor Station Apartments, applied for and received approval of an abatement before the sunset clause took effect. The Commission met with Mr. Fenaina and discussed the matter during a meeting in January. Following that discussion, the Commission requested that staff research additional information to help it consider the requested amendment. The Commission wanted to learn more about the economic and fiscal impacts of multiwunit developments in Windsor, particularly the Windsor Center Apartments. Also, how other towns treat multi-unit residential projects in their abatement policies. And finally, what guidance is there in the town's Plan of Conservation and Development or other plans regarding where to apply an incentive for multi-unit residential as part of an economic development strategy.

Tagged Interests: business, council, economic development, strategic, boards and commissions, development, procedure, Conservation, Development, abatement, small business, property, investment, policy, incentive, and housing

Discussion/Analysis At its May 13th meeting, the Economic Development Commission received and discussed the attached background report which responded to their request for additional information. In general, the key points include:

New multi-family residential units in Connecticut generate household spending in the community that can range up to 99,000 per unit based on national statistics The 130-unit Windsor Station Apartments is estimated to generate 3,000,000 in sales for Windsor businesses Annual tax revenue from six apartment and condo developments in Windsor range from 1,770 to 4,865 per unit Public school costs generated from existing multi-family developments can vary widely from one to another based factors such as unit size and age of apartment complex Of those towns that have a written abatement policy, a number do include permanent residential uses as eligible and many of these include language that directs these projects to targeted areas. While there is no specific discussion of the use of tax abatement for housing, or any other use for that matter, in the 2015 Plan of Conservation and Development, it does contain a number of references to development of housing, in particular, to mixed-use housing as a component of economic development strategy. Following its discussion, the Economic Development Commission determined that from an economic development perspective, a general amendment adding multiwunit residential as an eligible use as was requested would not be appropriate. However, they indicated a willingness to consider a more targeted application of eligibility if the Council wishes. Financial Im act None
Tagged Interests: business, finance, council, economic development, strategic, boards and commissions, sale, taxes, Taxes, development, Conservation, Development, abatement, commercial, education, policy, and housing

Other Board Action None

Recommendations This item is presented for discussion purposes. If the Town Council would like to pursue further discussion and review of the topic, it is suggested the item be referred to a Council committee, perhaps the Finance Committee. Attachments EDC Memorandum May 2020 o V; First in C,onneccicut. First tbr its citizens. To: From: Subject:
Tagged Interests: finance, council, and boards and commissions

Economic Development Commission

James Burke, Economic Development Director Amendment to Assessment Abatement Policy Multi-unit Residential Use BACKGROUND
Tagged Interests: economic development, boards and commissions, development, Development, abatement, and policy

in January, the Commission met with Daniel Ferraina, a Windsor-based property owner and developer, regarding his request that the Town amend the Assessment Abatement Policy to include new multi- family housing developments as an eligible type of business or land use. The Town's adopted policy

Tagged Interests: business, boards and commissions, development, Development, abatement, property, policy, and housing

currently allows the following eligible uses: manufacturing, class 'A' office space, office for advanced

medical procedures, and Significant Fiscal Impact projects, which makes a capital investment in taxable personal property and real estate improvements equal to or greater than 60 million.

The abatement policy previously allowed new multi-family residential projects within the Town Center area to be eligible. This was an eligible use for the period of January 2014 through January 31, 2017 when the clause sunset. The intent of that amendment was to promote immediate development in the Center. One project, Windsor Station Apartments, applied for and received approval of an abatement before the sunset clause took effect. During the discussion in January, the Commission requested that staff research additional information to help it consider the requested amendment. The Commission wanted to learn more about the economic and fiscal impacts of multi-unit developments in Windsor, particularly the Windsor Center Apartments. Also, how other towns treat multi-unit residential projects in their abatement policies. And finally, what guidance is there in the town's Plan of Conservation and Development or other plans regarding where to apply an incentive for multi-unit residential as part of an economic development strategy. DISCUSSION

Tagged Interests: economic development, strategic, boards and commissions, development, procedure, Conservation, Development, abatement, property, investment, policy, and incentive

A.
ECONOMIC AND FISCAL IMPACTS

No additional detail provided

Ecgngmjc-lmp.ug . The National Multifamily Housing Council has created an online calculator that projects the economic impact of constructing new apartments in each state (https://www.weareapartments.org/), For 130 new apartment homes (same number as Windsor Station Apartments) in Connecticut the total economic impact is estimated to be 45,447,391. Of this amount,

FAX .30 E c. t c c;nl they estimate total annual resident spending at 12,911,145 which translate to approximately 99,000 per unit. To get a more refined estimate of economic impact for the Windsor Station Apartments, we used ESRt
Tagged Interests: council, 911, and housing

Retail Goods and Services Expenditures for households within a 5 minute drive of Windsor Center. Using expenditure categories that are most appropriate to apartment residents, we estimate that

Tagged Interests: services

average household spending on key categories was 31,805 per unit. Assuming that 55 of those expenditures occur in the local area, this would estimate that Windsor Center businesses could

experience a increase in sales from the 130 unit developmenta (See attached table.)
Tagged Interests: business and sale

Fiscal Impact. To understand the fiscal impact that mufti-unit developments may have on the town we collected tax revenue and school expenditure data for six apartment and condo developments in Windsor. The attached table presents that information. As you wilt see, annual tax revenue per unit

ranges from 1,770 to 4,865. This range reflects differences in the age of the properties and the land area. The average cost for public schools presents an even wider range from 615 to 5,889 per unit. This difference comes from the number of students generated from each development which most likely correlates to the number of bedrooms provided. Overall, the data indicates that the fiscal impact of these multi-unit developments in Windsor ranges from - 3,684 to + 2,945 per unit per year, B, POLICIES FROM OTHER TOWNS A previous survey of sixty towns regarding use of incentives revealed that of the towns that utilize tax abatement, most do not have a written policy or regulation. These communities address each proposal on a case-by-case basis. Of those towns that have a policy, a number do include permanent residential uses as eligible and many of these include language that directs these projects to targeted areas. For example, Wallingford, Cromwell, and Tolland focus multi-unit abatements to downtown or special development zones. Vernon provides that residential abatements are limited to improvements to existing buildings. Canton has an elaborate weighting system for incentives that provides higher value to targeted areas of the town.

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, regulation, taxes, Taxes, development, downtown, Development, abatement, education, policy, students, and incentive

C.
WINDSOR PLAN OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT / ED STRATEGY

While there is no specific discussion of the use of tax abatement for housing, or any other use for that matter, in the 2015 Plan of Conservation and Development, it does contain the

Tagged Interests: strategic, taxes, Taxes, development, Conservation, Development, abatement, and housing

following references to development of housing, in particular, to mixed-use housing as a

Tagged Interests: development, Development, commercial, and housing

component of economic development strategy:

CHAPTER 8 - SUPPORT BUSINESS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Our mixed-use housing efforts in both Windsor Center and Great Pond can help create attractive housing options in close proximity to goods and services, making them attractive to both members of the shadow economy as well as the employees of ever more distributed employers,
Tagged Interests: business, economic development, strategic, development, services, Development, commercial, economy, and housing

0
fi

which could eventually lead to the smaller, more adaptive workplaces following the employees instead of vice versa. (page 8-12) Adaptive Strategies

12.
Continue to promote attractive mixed-use housing options to attract and retain workers in

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: commercial and housing

an effort to grow Windsor's economy from within. (page 8-13)

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: economy

CHAPTER 9 - ENHANCE THE VILLAGES

Strate ies to Enhance Windsor Center

No additional detail provided

9.
Promote and actively support additional housing as an essential component of a vital and economically successful mixed-use district. (page 9-12)

CHAPTER 10 - DAY HILL CORPORATE AREA Strategies for Increasing the Competitiveness of the Dav Hill Corporate Area

Tagged Interests: commercial, competitiveness, and housing

12.
Provide a variety of housing opportunities for employees within the DHCA in master-planned mixed-use communities that are compatible with surrounding commercial and industrial

development.
Tagged Interests: development, industrial, Development, commercial, and housing

13.
Provide density incentives for transfers of residential density that achieve desirable

community goals such as creating workforce housing, protecting farmland and open space, or creating vibrant residential villages.

Tagged Interests: workforce, incentive, and housing

14.
Provide opportunities for limited ancillary and neighborhood level retail services designed to

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: services and neighborhood

attract, retain, and meet the daily needs of employers, employees, and residents in and around

the DHCA, preferably as part of master-planned mixed-use developments.

Tagged Interests: development, Development, and commercial

15.
Provide opportunities for additional housing that creates mutually beneficial relationships

with adjacent mixed-use and stand-alone retail commercial developments. (page 10-19) STATE Connecticut Economic Impact of 130 New Apartment Homes.

Tagged Interests: development, Development, commercial, and housing

Economic Impact The combined contribution of apartment construction, renovation and repair, operations and resident spending to the metro economy.

Construction Renovation Repair Operation Expenditures Resident Spending
Tagged Interests: construction, Public Transit, and economy

Total Economic Impact

No additional detail provided

Impact from Tax Revenue

Operation Expenditures Resident Spending Total Impact from Tax Revenue Employment Impact 31,364,992 224,803 946,451 12,911,145 45,447,391 303,892 1,567,704 1,871,596 The total number of jobs supported by apartment construction, operations, and resident spending within the metro economy. Construction Renovation Repair Operations Resident Spending Total Jobs Supported 120
Tagged Interests: construction, 911, taxes, Taxes, Public Transit, employment, economy, and jobs

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Date: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Back ound Agenda Item Summary

Honorable Mayor and Members of the Town Council

James Burke, Economic Development Director Peter Souza, Town Manager Wilson Redevelopment Last year, as a first step in the possible redevelopment of the former Wolcott School site and the vacant town-owned parcel at 458 Windsor Avenue, staff and an ad-hoc task team gathered and reviewed information from the community as to preferred land uses. The ad-hoc team was comprised of members of the Wilson/Deerfield Advisory Committee, Economic Development Commission, Redevelopment Agency and a representative from the Town Planning and Zoning Commission. A community drop-in meeting was held and an on-line survey was deployed as a means of receiving input from the public on possible land uses and feedback on a handful of conceptual ideas. The goal of this effort has been to help town staff provide the Town Council with one or more recommendations for each parcel as part of the Council's consideration relative to future use and potential disposition of these neighborhood and community assets.
Tagged Interests: planning, council, economic development, boards and commissions, development, zoning, Development, property, manager, education, and neighborhood

Last summer staff provided Town Council with an overview of the community input received and outlined possible next steps. The topic was referred to the Town Improvements Committee which met in August 2019 and recomrnended the Town Council authorize funding for initial prew development technical assistance services. Committee members also expressed a desire for additional community outreach with a focus on gaining more input from neighborhood residents relative to the reuse of the two sites.

At the Town Council's meeting of September 3, 2019, the Council authorized fttnding for the completion of an A-2 survey of the school site as well as for hazardous materials testing of the building. Staff was also asked to pursue additional community input regarding reuse options for the properties. Discussion/Analysis Following Council direction, town staff contracted for a detailed site survey and hazardous materials inspection of the Wolcott School property. The A-2 survey was completed in October and is now available to assist the town and any potential developers of the property with up-to-date site information. A hazardous building materials inspection of the school building was conducted in December 2019 and January 2020. The inspection reports identified the presence of asbestos and limited areas of lead- based paint. The estimated cost for hazardous materials removal is 119,350.
Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, funding, council, sites, development, contract, materials, services, Development, property, education, hazardous materials, and neighborhood

To address the Council's desire for added neighborhood input, town staff had planned to facilitate an interactive public meeting(s) this spring. However, the arrival of the coronavirus required a different

approach. As a result, staff designed and implemented an online survey that was heavily marketed to the Wilson-Deerfield neighborhood. A copy of the summary report of the survey results is attached. Over 570 persons responded to the survey with 35 having a connection to the Wilson-Deerfield area either as a resident, business owner or property owner. Briefly, the survey found that among those who participated, a mixed use redevelopment was the preferred option for the Wolcott School site. For the redevelopment parcel, mixed use development and maintaining open space were the preferred options.
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, business, council, market, development, Development, property, education, and neighborhood

Other Board Action None at this time.

Recommendations Ifthe Town Council is in agreement, it is suggested that the Wilson Redevelopment Survey Results be referred to the Town Improvements Committee for discussion and a report back to the full council regarding guidance as to next steps. Attachments Wilson Redevelopment Parcels Survey Results Date: Prepared By: Reviewed By: Subject: Background MEMORANDUM Peter Souza, Town Manager Flavia Rey de Castro, Community Development Specialist James Burke, Economic Development Director Wilson Redevelopment Parcels Survey Results
Tagged Interests: council, economic development, boards and commissions, development, Development, property, manager, and community development

In 2019, staff and an ad-hoc task team gathered and reviewed information from the community as to preferred land uses at the former Roger Wolcott School site and the vacant town-owned parcel, at 458 Windsor Ave. The ad-hoc team was comprised of members of the Wilson/Deerfield Advisory Committee, Economic and Development Commission, Redevelopment Agency and a representative from the Town Planning and Zoning Commission. A community drop-in meeting was held and an online survey was deployed as means of receiving input from the public on possible land uses and feedback on a handful of conceptual ideas. Results of both the drop in meeting and the survey were discussed by the Town Council and the Town Improvements Committee in August and September of 2019. As a result of those discussions, the Council requested additional community outreach with a focus on gaining input from neighborhood residents.

Following up with the Town Council's request for further input from neighborhood residents, the Town originally planned to host a highly interactive public meeting, which was scheduled for May 21st. This meeting was to be followed by an online survey. However, given COVID-19, efforts were reoriented to conduct only an online survey. To ensure a significant participation from the Wilson and Deerfield (WD) neighborhoods, marketing efforts focused mainly on these two neighborhoods. Promotional postcards were sent to all addresses in these neighborhoods, Facebook ads targeted mainly users in Wilson and Deerfield, and promotional fliers were posted on businesses located in these neighborhoods only. Furthermore, incentives for completing the survey were only open to Wilson and Deerfield Residents and Property Owners. The 2020 Survey was designed as a continuation of the 2019 process. The options provided were a combination of preferred use identified by the public, and feedback from the Town Council and Town Improvements Committee meetings. Participants were given three options to choose from at each site plus the option to comment/ suggest additional ideas. At Roger Wolcott, the options were mixed use, single family houses, and to re-use the existing building, and at the redevelopment parcel, the options were mixed use, residential townhouses, and to maintain an open space. Discussion Anal sis The survey was completed by 572 participants, of these, 35 either lived, worked or owned a property at the WD neighborhoods and 54 lived elsewhere in Windsor. Of those connected to WD, 46 indicated being connected to the neighborhoods for more than 20 years, and 21
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, Homebuilder, planning, business, council, market, boards and commissions, development, zoning, Development, property, education, social media law, incentive, and neighborhood

from 10 to 20 years. Please refer to appendix 1 for further breakdown of survey results and participants.

Former Roger Wolcott School The preferred option was Mixed Use. Results are interpreted comparing both the most and least popular options. Although, reusing the existing building was the most popular option (42 ), followed closely by Mixed Use (41 ), this option was more unpopular by a higher difference. 31 of all participants listed reusing the building as their least preferred option as opposed to 23 for Mixed Use. When subtracting least popular from most popular, mixed use is the most popular choice. Responses from participants associated with Wilson and Deerfield are very similar to those from residents who live elsewhere in Windsor; at the same time, results for these two subgroups mirror those from all survey takers. For a visual of all responses please see appendix 1. Redevelopment Parcel

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, property, and education

When following the same methodology, comparing the most and least preferred options, results are less clear for the redevelopment parcel. Mixed Use is the preferred use very closely followed by maintaining an open space. 48 of respondents prefer to maintain the space open, followed by Mixed Use, which was preferred by 37 of respondents. However, 33 list maintaining the space open as their least favorite option, as opposed to 20 who list mixed use as their least preferred option. When subtracting least popular from most popular, Mixed Use is slightly more popular than maintaining an open space. Similarly to the results in Roger Wolcott, responses from participants associated with Wilson and Deerfield are very similar to those from residents who live elsewhere in Windsor as well as responses from all survey takers. For a visual of all responses please see appendix 1.

Survey Takers by Residence Appendix 1 Survey Breakdown
Tagged Interests: property

55
-64

No additional detail provided

45
-54

No additional detail provided

35
- 44

No additional detail provided

25
-34

Survey Participants Age by

9
2

54 500 Associated with Wilson or Deerfield Elsewhere in Windsor Not in Windsor Not identified 65 +

18
- 24

Under 18 3 50 100 150 200

WILSON/ DEERFIELD PARTICIPANTS: DURATION OF RESIDENCE

O/cog

Town Council Resignations/Appointments/Reappointments

Resignations

Tagged Interests: council, boards and commissions, and appointments

A.
B.

Accept the resignation of Linda Rickard from the Commission on Aging Persons with Disabilities Accept the resignation of Dominic DeCarlo from the Conservation Commission Appointments / Reappointments (to be acted upon at tonight's meeting) None

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, appointments, and Conservation

Names submitted for consideration of appointment One Democratic Member Hanford Area Cable Television Advisory Council Two Year Term to expire June 20, 2022 or until a successor is appointed (Patricia Bruhn)

MOVE to reappoint Patricia Bruhn as a Democratic member to the Hartford Area Cable Television Advisory Council for a two year term to expire June 30, 2022 or until a successor is appointed.
Tagged Interests: council, boards and commissions, and appointments

One Republican Member Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Commission Four Year Term to expire March 31, 2024 or until a successor is appointed (Paul St. Amand)

MOVE to reappoint Paul St. Amand as a Republican member to the Inland Wetlands and Watercourses Commission for a four year term to expire March 31, 2024 or until a successor is appointed.

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions and appointments

c.
One Democratic Member Youth Commission Three Year Tenn to expire September 30, 2021 or until a successor is appointed

(Bruce McCormick) MOVE to reappoint Bruce McCormick as a Democratic member to the Youth Commission for a three year term to expire September 30, 2021 or until a successor is appointed.

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, appointments, and youth

D.
One Democratic Member Zoning Board of Appeals Four Year Term to expire November 1 0, 2023 or until a successor is available (Max Kuziak)

MOVE to reappoint Max Kuziak as a Democratic member to the Zoning Board of Appeals for a four year term to expire November 10, 2023 or until a successor is appointed. Lower Farmington River Salmon Brook Wild Scenic Committee MOVE to: APPOINT Charles Button as a Democratic member to the Lower Farmington River Salmon Brook Wild Scenic Committee for a two year term to expire August 3, 2022 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT Jennifer Filer as an Unaffiliated Alternate member to the Lower Farmington River Salmon Brook Wild Scenic Committee for a two year term to expire August 3, 2022 or until a successor is appointed. Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy MOVE to: APPOINT Neil Chaudhary as a Democratic member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT Jeffrey Dyreson as a Democratic member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. Citizen Adviso Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Ener continued APPOINT Barbara Peyton as a Republican member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT George Slate as a Republican member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT Pamela Stratton as a Republican member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT Eric Weiner as a Democratic member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed. APPOINT Elizabeth Yetman as a Democratic member to the Citizen Advisory Task Force on Clean and Sustainable Energy for a one year term to expire August 3, 2021 or until a successor is appointed.

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, appointments, zoning, watershed, and energy

VVlN5S k first in Connecticut. First for its citizens.

TOWN COUNCIL VIRTUAL MEETING JUNE 15, 2020 Regular Town Council Meeting UNAPPROVED MINUTES 1) CALL TO ORDER

Mayor T rinks called the meeting to order at 7:34 p.m.

No additional detail provided

Present: Mayor Donald T rinks, Deputy Mayor Joe McAuliffe, Councilor Nuchette Black-Burke, Councilor Lisa Rampulla Bress, Councilor James Dobler, Councilor James Govoni, Councilor Donald Jepsen, Councilor Lenworth Walker, and Councilor Kenneth Wilkos

2) PRAYER OR REFLECTION Councilor Wilkos led the group in prayer/reflection. 3) PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE Councilor Wilkos led the group in the Pledge of Allegiance.

Tagged Interests: religion

4) PROCLAMATIONS AND AWARDS - None

5) PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS AND PETITIONS

Tagged Interests: recognition, communications, and Communications

John Dunn, 15 Strawberry, would like to refer to the Amazon project as the Amazon Monster because of the size of the proposed structure and the affects it will have on the community. He predicts that there will be regular traffic issues due to the various nearby on and off ramps from Interstate 91. There will be heavy traffic causing traffic jams around the schools and shopping areas near River Street. Mr. Dunn believes the project is too large for the immediate area even though it has been zoned industrial for the available plot of land.

Leroy Smith, 531 Edgewood, will address the Amazon issue later, but would like to focus on his support towards the declaring of racism as a public health crisis. Mr. Smith's daughter experienced discrimination and was given different secondary opportunities as well as various extracurricular activities, in comparison to her white peers, while attending Windsor public schools. This will have an effect on her and her friends' future. Mr. Smith believes that Windsor Public Schools is a catalyst for the disparities among people of color. He would like this to be addressed by the town and for the town to adopt an ordinance. He then moved on expressing his concerns about the Amazon project. Mr. Smith stated that the town should be focusing on vibrant, livable community additions instead of a wealthy global company.

Tagged Interests: health, ordinance, streets, industrial, zoning, discrimination, transportation, watershed, education, internet retailers, civil rights, and traffic

WINt5S R Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 2

Eric Weiner, 76 Palisado Avenue, referred to the Amazon project in terms of the abatement. He stated it would be the most expedient thing to do to vote yes on the town's proposal for the tax abatement. However, at some point, municipalities need to step in and say enough is enough with catering to large companies, especially with such a large tax break. Mr. Weiner would like to humbly request the Council consider not giving Amazon the tax abatement.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: council, taxes, Taxes, abatement, and internet retailers

Susan Miller, 10 Ethan Drive, also agreed with Mr. Weiner that Amazon should not get a tax abatement, because with or without it, Amazon will come to Windsor. MS, Miller was very happy to see the virtual net metering on the agenda because she believes that moving toward 100 renewable energy is the right move for the town. Ms. Miller would also like to express her support for the resolution to declare racism as a public health crisis.

No additional detail provided

Tagged Interests: health, taxes, Taxes, discrimination, abatement, internet retailers, civil rights, and energy

Judge Kevin Washington, Chair of the Human Relations Commission, would like to extend his appreciation for the participation in last weekend's event on June 7th to all of the Town of Windsor Town Council members and employees, with a special thanks to Mayor Donald T rinks. It was one of the largest events the Human Relations Commission has hosted. He is trying to develop programming and support of the issue at hand for racial discrimination and diversity. The resolution is heavily supported by the Human Relations Commission. Judge Washington also recognized the importance of celebrating and supporting the LGBTQ community.

Kay McAuliffe, 18 Kellogg Street, is not in support of the tax break for Amazon, but is in support for the racism resolution to declare racism as a public health crisis. Ms. McAuliffe is happy to see that Windsor is following in other town's footsteps to move toward a better resolution to support diversity and improving the community's rights. She would like to see the defunding and demilitarizing of police. Windsor police paid a significant amount of money toward guns and vehicles, when it could have been redirected toward social services and public health measures, and could even be put toward schools.
Tagged Interests: gun control, health, recognition, council, legal, boards and commissions, streets, social services, taxes, Taxes, public safety, discrimination, services, events, racial, LGBTQ, education, internet retailers, Gun Control, diversity, judge, and civil rights

Lakisha Hyatt, 104 Benjamin Court, addressed the topic of declaring racism as a public health crisis and the everyday disparities and inequality that severely affects black and brown individuals in Windsor. She stated that this is a public crisis because racism does in fact infect the lives and livelihoods of the black and brown residents jn Windsor. Ms. Hyatt deeply supports the resolution of declaring racism as a public health crisis. She asks that there be a team of accountability, since there is an opportunity to talk about this with the police and discussing changes in handling situations such as eliminating holds and reviewing mental health training. This will create a systemic change. Ms. Hyatt applauds Councilor Black-Burke for eloquently speaking on this issue.

Ashanti Osbourne Martin, 85 Pierce Boulevard, expressed her intent to speak in favor of the Town of Windsor declaring racism as a public health crisis because this declaration is not just to be acknowledged, but is an opportunity to put forth solutions. This is something that needs to be managed, due to the evidence of racial bias in the Windsor public schools and how various town resources such as regular maintenance, infrastructure improvements, and park improvements are allocated fairly, Ms. Martin also expressed her concern for the health care provided to the black community, especially during the pandemic, who are dying at a much higher rate than their VVlNfr5S R Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 3 white counterparts. It also goes beyond the coronavirus, which includes police violence Ms. Martin's hope is that this resolution will help Windsor not only declare racism as a health crisis, but also reallocate resources and provide more training opportunities and discussion to police officers and residents of the town in order to combat this issue. Melissa Strother, 60 Nod Road, would like to speak in favor for declaring racism as a public health crisis. This will offer a clear path to intentionally acknowledge disparities and inequalities, which is the first step. Ms. Strother expressed that she does not want something to happen in the Town of Windsor like the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. It is important to protect the liberties and rights of the black and brown community. Ms. Miller would like to see that not only police but also the residents be educated about racism and how it impacts the black and brown communities that are unacknowledged and the harm that is causes. Ms. Strother asked that racism be thought as a public health crisis in order to prevent injustices in the future and that everyone survives the way that they should. 6) COMMUNICATIONS FROM COUNCIL MEMBERS Councilor Dobler addressed the two major topics for the evening with the first being the tax abatement for Amazon. Councilor Dobler expressed that there was never a chance that the 7 year 100 abatement was going to be agreed to. He is grateful that there have been many continued negotiations, leaving neither side happy with the agreement and that's when you know it is a fair agreement. Councilor Dobler's second topic discussed was the vote to declare racism as a public health crisis. This vote will allow to officially start the conversation for change. Councilor Dobler added a quick comment that baseball and softball little leagues have returned. Councilor Walker would like to remind everyone to stay safe and support small local businesses. Secondly, after listening intently to the speakers, he suggested that we can look at the glass as half full or half empty referring to racism in the community. He would like to be optimistic with the glass being half full* The community should celebrate the diversity of Windsor. We have implemented so many programs in Windsor that are the envy of other towns. There is more to be done involving racism, but let us celebrate the successes of Windsor and improve on those. Councilor Walker supports the resolution, but also stated that the Windsor Police Department should be celebrated, not defunded, after the many positive interactions between the police men and women and the residents in town. Councilor Walker would like to allow the federal government and state government to handle the greater health disparities while we as residents in the Town of Windsor focus on more of the local issues, such as noise complaints or neighborly troubles. Windsor does not have these larger issues and that should be celebrated.

Tagged Interests: road, coronavirus, health, business, legal, streets, taxes, Taxes, public safety, hotel, discrimination, program, racial, training, parks, communications, abatement, education, Communications, internet retailers, mental health, accountability, body art, diversity, noise, civil rights, and court

Councilor Govoni had no further comments.

Councilor Black-Burke would like to thank all of the speakers during the public comment at the beginning of the meeting. They spoke with honesty about their feelings on the racism crisis. Councilor Black-Burke would also like to thank the Human Relations Commission and educators, and students for what they had to say on the green during the event. Councilor Black-Burke Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 4 would like to call to everyone's attention the successful COVID 19 testing operation at the Windsor shopping center. Thank you to everyone who was a part of that and making it a success.
Tagged Interests: boards and commissions, discrimination, events, commercial, civil rights, and students

Councilor Wilkos had no further comments.

Councilor Rampulla Bress expressed how grateful she is to the community for addressing the issues they want resolved The community is what the Council is here for and when the community speaks, it is important to listen. Councilor Rampulla Bress looks forward to working with Councilor Black-Burke and the rest of the councilors on approving this ordinance, because the proclamation is extremely important. It is clear that the community wants this as well. Councilor Rampulla Bress would also like to wish everyone a happy Pride Month. Councilor Jepsen thanked the Human Relations Commission for the opportunity to speak at the event as well as his fellow Council members who also spoke. It was a very wonderful day. Councilor Jepsen also extended a special congratulations to all of the Windsor graduates.
Tagged Interests: ordinance, recognition, council, boards and commissions, and events

Deputy Mayor McAuliffe thanked the Human Relations Commission for putting together the event two Sunday's ago, and for fellow Council members who spoke at the event. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe especially focused on Councilor Black-Burke's moving speech about being a mother and worrying about her children and other mothers, their sons, and their losses. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe extended a thank you to Councilor Black-Burke for her contribution to the successful event.

Mayor Trinks thanked the Human Relations Commission for coordinating the event. It truly showed the diversity of the town and the town's ability to come together. Mayor Trinks acknowledged the impressive attendance from the young adults who contributed to the event. Mayor T rinks stated that although he may not be able to attend the graduation, he would like to congratulate the Windsor graduates.

Tagged Interests: council, boards and commissions, events, graduation, and diversity

7) REPORT OF APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMISSION

Tagged Interests: boards and commissions and appointments

Mayor T rinks stated that the Public Building Commission, Economic Development Commission, and Housing Code Board of Appeals have submitted a written report to the Council, and each Councilor has received a copy.

a) Public Building Commission b) Economic Development Commission c) Housing Code Board of Appeals 8) TOWN MANAGER'S REPORT

Tagged Interests: Homebuilder, council, economic development, boards and commissions, development, Development, manager, and housing

Concerts on the Green First Town Downtown is sorry to announce that they will not be hosting concerts on the green during the summer of 2020 due to the many concerns of volunteers, musicians, sponsors and

Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 5 not knowing what the state guidelines will be later this summer about large groups. For more information call 860-688-5715.
Tagged Interests: downtown and volunteer

Farmer's Market to Beqin July 2 First Town Downtown is very excited to be moving forward with the Farmers' Market with new guidelines to keep everyone safe. It will run from July 2 through October 15 on Thursdays from 3:30 - 6:30 pm at 240 Broad Street in Windsor Center. This well-attended local marketplace in Windsor Center includes locally grown fruits, vegetables, baked goods, herbs, eggs, cheese, skincare products, candles and more. For more information call 860-688-5715.

Windsor Libraries The Main and Wilson Branch Libraries are scheduled to re-open to the public on June 22. All visitors and staff will be required to wear a face covering and maintain social distancing of six feet. If unable to wear a face cover, curbside pick-up will still be available for all patrons. Public computers can be used for one hour per day per person with a library card. The fax machine and photocopier will be available for independent use with a credit/debit card or exact change. Patrons will be encouraged to wipe down keyboards before using them. Disinfecting towels and hand sanitizer will be provided. Programs and the virtual collection will continue to be offered online at www.windsorlibrary.com.

Tagged Interests: shelter in place, coronavirus, market, streets, agriculture, downtown, program, computers, and library

Summer 2020 hours at the main library will be Monday -Thursday 10-7, Friday and Saturday 10-5. Wilson Branch hours will be Monday 10-7:30, Tuesday-Friday 10-5:30 and Saturday 10- 3.

Summer Camps Recreation summer camps and Northwest Park educational camps begin on Monday, June 29, in a modified fashion to comply with orders by the state. Camp programs will be offered at various locations, including LP Wilson, 330 Windsor Ave., and Clover Street School. Registration is on-going, and scholarships are available. For more information, call 860-285- 1990 or go to https://townofwindsorct.com/recreation/camps-pools-parks/ Swim lessons pools Goslee Pool and Welch Pool will be open as of July 1. By state orders, the number of patrons permitted in the pool area will be limited to the number that can safely fit on the pool deck area while practicing social distancing. Senior swim, open swim, and lap swim will be offered at various times throughout the day. To avoid potentially long lines, we are encouraging individuals to reserve swim times online at www.townofwindsorct.com/recreation. In addition, Recreation is offering a scaled-down version of swim lessons. Lessons will be for levels Parent-Tot, Water Adjustment with a Parent/Guardian, Level 4, and 5. For more information, call the Recreation Department at 860-285-1990 or go to https://townofwindsorct.com/recreation/camps-pools-parks/ Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 COVID Financial Recap

Tagged Interests: finance, streets, utility, Utility, program, water, parks, education, library, and recreation

6
We are projecting to incur approximately 195,000 in various expenses related to addressing COVID-19. These costs are being covered by the FY 20 General Fund. Included in this estimate is approximately 68,000 in unemployment expenses due to furloughing or reducing hours of 69 part-time employees and reducing hours of 6 full-time positions.

We will be pursuing partial reimbursement for eligible expenses through federal and state assistance, In terms of revenue, our overall General Fund revenues have not been negatively impacted over the past few months. Two of our Enterprise Funds and several special revenue accounts have been impacted in terms of revenue. Some of the loss in revenue has been mitigated by lower program expenses. Through the end of the current budget year, the two enterprise funds are projected to have a new loss totaling 215,000, with the Discovery Center accounting for 187,000 of the loss. Combined Recreation, Senior Center and Northwest Park user fee accounts are projected to experience a new loss of approximately 60,000 for FY 20. Looking ahead to FY 21, the two enterprise funds, as well as summer recreation programs, are likely to see less revenues as programs are being modified and scaled back to meet State safety guidelines. Unfortunately, program expenses will not be noticeably less due to staffing ratios, additional materials and supply costs. Credit Ratinq Reaffirmed and Bond Sale Results Standard and Poor's (S P) has reaffirmed the Town's AAA credit rating for the 2020 bond and note issue. Our rating was affirmed after S P reviewed and analyzed various aspects of the local and regional economy, recent economic development activity, management practices, fiscal and debt management practices, budgetary performance, retirement plan stewardship and our other post-employment benefits program. The Credit Profile report documents had a number of positives put forth by S P, such as our strong economy, strong management practices and strong budgetary flexibility .
Tagged Interests: coronavirus, funding, economic development, budget, sale, retirement, development, bond, seniors, materials, program, performance, employment, parks, Development, human resources, poverty, economy, and recreation

The bond and note sale took place on Thursday, June 12th and the results were favorable. The town received nine bids on the bond sale and Janney Montgomery Scott LLC was the low bidder at 1.8 TIC. The issue consisted of 15,570,000 general obligation bonds with a 20 year term and interest rates ranging from 5.00/0 down to 2.0 (average rate or coupon 3.17 ). The issue came with a cash premium of approx. 1.1 million.

The town received 5 bids on the bond anticipation note. This issue consisted of a one year note in the amount of 12,500,000 with a 2 interest rate and premium in the amount of 188 000* Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 7 The proceeds from the bond and note sale will be used to finance projects in the FY 20 capital improvement project, as well as provide funds for the continuing construction of the public safety facilities at 110 Addison Road and 300 Bloomfield Avenue. We will close on the bond and note sale and receive proceeds on Thursday, June 25th 9) REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES Town Improvements Committee Councilor Dobler reported that the Town Improvements Committee will be meeting next week. Special Projects Committee Councilor Dobler nothing to report. Health Safety Committee Councilor Black-Burke stated a date has not been solidified for the next Health Safety Committee meeting, but it will be determined in the very near future. Especially pending the results of the approval of the resolution. Personnel Committee Councilor Rampulla Bress said the committee will be meeting on June 24th, and will be interviewing 17 candidates for the Farmington River and Salmon Brook Wild and Scenic Coordinating Committee. There are only two spots available, but the committee is thrilled at the response from all of the qualified applicants. There will be a second meeting the following month set to interview for the Task Force and applications are due June 22nd. Councilor Bress would also like all applicants to consider putting a second choice when interviewing, because there may be other committees that interest them and have open slots available. Finance Committee Deputy Mayor McAuliffe stated that the Finance Committee met a week ago and there was very good public comment, particularly relating to the Amazon project. All items mentioned will be discussed later in the meeting. 10) 11) ORDINANCES None UNFINISHED BUSINESS a) Consider Fixed Assessment Agreement and Building Permit Feed Reduction for Amazon RESOLVED by Councilor Dobler, seconded by Councilor Jepsen that the Town Manager is authorized and directed to execute on behalf of the Town of Windsor a fixed assessment agreement between the Town of Windsor and Amazon.com Services, LLC which is generally consistent with the attached draft form of agreement and RESOLVED that the Town Manager is authorized and directed to execute on behalf of the Town of Windsor a building permit fee reduction agreement between the Town of Windsor and Amazon.com Services, LLC which is generally consistent with the attached draft form of agreement. Town Manager Souza provided a brief overview about the adopted assessment abatement policy and incentives. The assessment abatement policy helps guide the Council toward final decisions. Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 8 One goal of the abatement policy is to increase or maintain the non-residential tax base. The Town Council has the sole discretion to approve the fixed assessments or abatements. The town also has a building permit fee reduction policy, which allows authorization of a reduced permit fee for certain types of industries, including large projects like the Amazon project. The Amazon project does qualify under the town's economic incentive policy as well as the town's building permit fee reduction. The company and staff have been discussing a possible abatement agreement and there will be a three year agreement with a declining abatement for real estate only. In lieu of a longer abatement period, it is suggested that a 50 reduction of the upfront building fee be considered. The terms have been concurred by Amazon and the proposed agreement is attached for both incentives. It includes the term of the abatement, investment schedules, and improvements to be made by no later than October 1, 2021. It also agrees that the Council has a right to extend the timeline if the Council finds it reasonable that the company has continued to pursue the project even though they have not met that time frame. Amazon states that the company will put forth good efforts to employ qualifying residents for full and part time positions and there has been added language to the agreement for the company to support Windsor based organizations and programs through a variety of means. The town's earnings are projected in this attached plan as well. Over a seven year period, the town has the possibility to receive over 30 million in revenue to the town. Mr. Brad Griggs from Amazon is on the line to answer any further questions about the Amazon project.

Tagged Interests: rfp, road, Homebuilder, RFP, funding, health, ordinance, construction, business, finance, streets, sale, taxes, Taxes, capital spending, personnel, bond, public safety, Capital Spending, services, program, watershed, abatement, investment, manager, policy, internet retailers, rates, and incentive

Councilor Dobler commented on the abatement earlier and believes that the negotiations are fair on both sides. Councilor Dobler also questioned Town Manager Souza on how the abatement will work in order to clarify that it does not come out of the tax payers dollars. Town Manager Souza briefly explained that the abatement reduces the tax liability for real estate that the company has. Currently the parcel that is under consideration creates 114,000 in revenue for the town. If the project is constructed under the terms of the agreement, the revenue from real estate taxes and personal property taxes will be greater so that it reduces the tax liability for the company. Councilor Dobler responded and confirmed that his questions were answered, and reiterated that Amazon is not paying as much as they would without an abatement, but there is also no money coming out of the town because of the agreement.

Councilor Walker addressed the size of the project being a concern, but the success of the company will contribute to the capitalist society. Councilor Walker is also concerned that the wages are lower than they should be for future Amazon employees Councilor Rampulla Bress stated she understands the financial impact that Amazon will have on the community, It is clear that the amount of money received each year will have a significant impact on the community along with what the Council can do for the town. Councilor Rampulla Bress' only reservation is about the hesitancy of Amazon to commit prior to this agreement to some items that are important to the community and to her as a Councilor. Her concern is not about the financial impact, but it is important in Windsor that there is other criteria for judging what kind of businesses are wanted in the town. We pride ourselves for the relationships built between small and large businesses here in the community and what they mean to the residents. Councilor Rampulla Bress would like to know what was specifically told to Windsor about the community connection since the last time she spoke with Mr. Griggs about this concern. Mr. Griggs stated WINii* R Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 9 that there were 12,800 items shared. Councilor Bress would like to know what was specifically shared with the other Amazon warehouses and Windsor. If something is not articulated in the contract, sometimes it doesn't happen, but in good faith it is important for the Amazon Company to be a positive contributor to the community. Another concern is the wage. The Amazon wage is respectable for now in the year 2020, but will the wage be adjusted for the future opening when minimum wage requirements may be higher in the years 2021 or 2022. Councilor Rampulla Bress would also like the solar panel plans to be explained, as she stated it is very disappointing that there was not a direct answer for such an important addition to their sustainable energy initiative. Mr. Brad Griggs responded to Councilor Rampulla Bress that the items mentioned by Town Manager Souza earlier in the meeting have been discussed. In addition to the 12,800 items donated to the residents, there has also been hiring events provided for the residents and there are already over 250 residents employed at the Day Hill Road facility. Mr. Griggs answered Councilor Rampulla Bress' wage question when he stated those wages include twenty to thirty percent benefits bringing total wages above 18 per hour. The wage is a company-wide mandate, but the entry level associate hourly wage is 15.75 and that is without the benefits, overtime and bonuses. Mr. Griggs followed up on Councilor Rampulla Bress' question about solar. When stated from a sustainability standpoint, Amazon is in the process of developing dozens of facilities of this size that have hundreds of thousands of square footage. Their solar team will evaluate the building and will then add the panels based on the capabilities of the completed project All buildings are designed to have the capability for solar but it is dependent on an evaluation. It is a significant capital investment to commit to, and Amazon will work for sustainable efforts as it is a priority for the town. Mr. Griggs stated that Amazon has the most solar paneled facilities in the country. Councilor Bress followed up with being encouraged by Mr. Grigg's answers. Councilor Bress is still not sure about if the 15.75 wage is referring to the current year or to the future years, when the facility is planning to open. Mr. Griggs commented that Amazon is committed to the starting wage of 15.75, but there was no reference to inflation in the coming years. Councilor Wjlkos wanted to thank the public for their support and concerns regarding the Amazon project. The community should know that Windsor has had their abatement policy for many years. It was enacted in 2004. Councilor Wilkos believes it does need to be revisited moving forward. Councilor Wilkos referred to Mr. Dunn's comment from earlier about the Amazon monster project. Councilor Wilkos stated while it does fit all of the building codes and land approvals, it is a rather large, but magnificent project for the Kennedy Road location. Councilor Wilkos explained that when you purchase personal property it can never be assumed that it will always look the way it does. He added that you will never know what your new neighbor will be, but times always change. It is irrelevant that Amazon is one of the wealthiest companies in the world. They should not be shamed in terms of the Town of Windsor's written policy in order to meet their financial needs and put money into the community. Councilor Wilkos then addressed the questions of fair wages when he stated that these are entry level jobs, which will provide a higher wage than the average minimum wage in Connecticut. Councilor Wilkos believes that the seven year abatement was not going to be approved to begin with. Now with the agreements in place, the only concern that remains is that it would be hard to repurpose a building of that size if Amazon were to leave that location He is in agreement with the three year on average 50 abatement, which will benefit the community as a whole. VVINi SciR Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 10 Councilor Black-Burke expressed that she is struggling with approving the project, because of the concerns that have been mentioned about the size of the facility, where it sits, and if Amazon decides to vacate in the future. Secondly, Councilor Black-Burke asked Town Manager Souza, what Amazon specifically will be contributing to the community. Town Manager Souza responded that the language as drafted is that Amazon is committing to implementing programs based on various needs of the town. The programs may be evolving and changing at the moment because Amazon does already have other programs within the company that have been created to be used in each location's communities across the country. Councilor Black-Burke would like to know what the programs are in other places. She would also like to know if the 12,800 items are going to be contributed to the community in the future upon the agreement of the facility or to the existing facility on Day Hill Road. Town Manager Souza confirmed that the 12,800 items have come from the Day Hill Road location, but he does not recall the time frame, whether it was six months or twelve months. Councilor Black-Burke would like to know the time frame and what the dollar amount equals to in regards to the 12,800 items donated. Mr. Griggs responded that those numbers are year to date as of the Finance Committee meeting on June 1st. Mr. Griggs also explained that there is not a specific dollar amount given that these are mostly Amazon goods, and the PPE requirement items were initially donated. Councilor Black-Burke then stated that she would like to know what these items included. Mr. Griggs responded accordingly by naming items donated, such as toys, household items, pet supplies, cleaning supplies, school supplies, other consumables, and PPEs. Councilor Black-Burke believes that it would be important for the community to know a dollar amount or what has been directly contributed. Councilor Black-Burke would like more information regarding the college tuition reimbursement opportunities offered from Amazon. Mr. Griggs stated that college reimbursement is not directly part of the benefits package but Amazon offers a Career Choice program after one year of company employment. All employees are encouraged to pursue attending college, career advancement and licensing. Amazon will cover up to 95 of those efforts. This is not dependent upon being involved in advancing your career with Amazon, it can be in any field of the employee's choosing. Councilor BlackwBurke would like to know how tax deduction is affected if there is not a dollar amount to support the donations made. Mr. Griggs responded that Amazon donated approximately 70,000 additional items from the North Haven facility. He also stated that he will follow up with a dollar amount. Councilor Govonj would like to bring attention to the residents. He said that by state law, the town is required to have a Plan of Conservation Development meeting every ten years, and when this time comes around, the public does not attend or speak up until a large development decides to come to town. The industrial lights have been indicators for over ten years that this land would be developed eventually. Councilor Govoni urged residents that when you have concerns about the development of the town, take the time to attend the Plan of Conservation Development VVlN5SciR Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 11 meetings. Councilor Govoni also wanted to call attention to the solar panel plan in relation to snow loads and snow removal in the winter. This could pose a problem and it is important to be considered beforehand. Councilor Govoni thanked the Finance Committee and Mr. Griggs for providing a clear picture of the Amazon project plans. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe would like to echo the concerns that other Councilors brought up in regards to the wages and whether or not inflation is considered when giving these wages, especially since the project will not open for some time. He is also in agreement to revise the town's abatement policy. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe would like to step back and look at the big picture of our current circumstances during the pandemic and loss of jobs. It is important to view this Amazon project as a positive because they will be providing 1,000 jobs with benefits. The reality is the pandemic could worsen and have more people out of work. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe believes that this will be a financial benefit for the Town of Windsor. It could allow for low tax increases or none, improve schools, promote small and local businesses, and other maintenance opportunities throughout the town. Deputy Mayor McAuliffe asked that residents do research and look at the Windsor Amazon project in comparison to other local Amazon projects in the northeast and their requested tax abatements. It is important to thank the Council and everyone involved for negotiating and getting a reasonable abatement put into place, Councilor Jepsen would like to start with technical questions about the facility agreement. Councilor Jepsen confirmed that per the agreement Amazon will only be leasing the facility and would like to know how the owner will be involved in the agreement. Town Manager Souza responded that there will be a letter that is from the owner, Skadell Properties, with a clear delineation value that if this abatement passes, that the tenant is responsible for the taxes. Councilor Jepsen followed up with his second question regarding Amazon and the decision to add solar panels after the facility has been running for a year or two. He asked if there would be a new abatement rate due to the solar panel addition. Town Manager Souza confirmed that after the company gets their certificate of occupancy, there is no other value that gets abated or the building permit reduction does not apply after purchase. Councilor Jepsen said historically before abatements were put into place, there were other incentives Windsor would do for a developer and this project is half of that. But there will be a sense of relief while doing budgets this year with Amazon coming in, being a great source of revenue for the town. It will make future years for budgeting a lot easier as well. As long as the labor rate goes up and budget rates go up, the Amazon project will support that, and Councilor Jepsen is in support of the project. Mayor T rinks would like to start by saying that Amazon kept its word in the past in reference to the Day Hill Road project* They held three job fairs to solicit Windsor residents for employment opportunities with Amazon. Mayor T rinks often looks at the profitable companies in Windsor that do not make contributions or donate to the community. A lot of big profitable companies are rarely heard from in regards to the community, so it is positive that Amazon has already made that commitment. It will be a lot of money coming into the Town of Windsor, but Mayor T rinks is concerned about the longer term of unemployment and businesses potentially closing due to the coronavirus and considering those losses of revenue. Mayor T rinks has concerns that the call centers and other offices in the building might need to reevaluate the size needed for office space due to working remotely during the pandemic if it continues. There are concerns about the grand WINItjS R Windsor Town Council Meeting Minutes June 15, 2020 12 list and having more vacancies. The Amazon project is a guaranteed income stream, coming from a company that is making a significant investment in the town. Mayor T rinks does not foresee Amazon wanting to leave this location within the next 10 years. The example has already been set at the Day Hill Road location. Mayor T rinks is also not concerned about traffic issues increasing, as evidence shows from the Day Hill Road location. Amazon is a time focused company and will have the convenience of using Route 20. In addition to the office vacancy, he is also concerned about how the state funding will change and how it will be able to contribute to Windsor and the surrounding towns. Mayor T rinks concluded that the project outweighs the negatives that have been brought up and looks forward to the benefits it will bring 29,000 people in the town.
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Motion Passed 9-0-0